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Stickell DD- 888 - History

Stickell DD- 888 - History


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Stickell
(DD-888: dp. 2,425; 1. 390'6; b. 40'10; dr. 18'6; s. 34.6 k. (tl.); cpl. 345; a. 6 5, 10 40mm., 10 21 tt.;cl. Gearing)

Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Tex., by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp.; launched on 16 June 1945, sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell; and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.

Assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, Stickell operated under Commander, Amphibious Training, Galveston, for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, S.C., on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Va., on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge (CV-33). She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, Calif., on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan' China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.

On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on the 27th and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer's first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, Calif., on 4 August.

For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments, one off Yong-do on 28 February with Rochester (CA-132), one at the bombline on 5 March; and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with Saint Paul (CA-73). On the 19th, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hungnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.

After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April, then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for drydocking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea's east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, on the 6th, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on the 14th and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on the 27th. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.

Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953 Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad. She reached Norfolk, Va., on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.

For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul; and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.

In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her antiaircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD- Home ported at Newport, R.I., she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Antisubmarine Warfare Forces; then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.

She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard at Boston, Mass., for a six week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico; then returned to Newport.

On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of South Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Tonkin Gulf; plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger ( CVA-61), and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsiung, Formosa; Yokosuka, Japan; Subic Bay, Philippines; Hong Kong; and Naha, Okinawa. En route back to Newport-completely circumnavigating the world-Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaya; Cochin, India; and Aden. She transited the Suez and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca, and Gibraltar. The ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.

In October 1966, Stickell entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for overhaul. She emerged in February 1967 and headed toward Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen Norway; Aarjus, Denmark; Sundsvall, Sweden; and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with Essex (CVS-9) and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy; Valletta, Malta, and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.

Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew's already finely honed efficiency. Following Springboard, she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.

The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell's next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy's Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico; Recife, Brazil; Luanda, Angola; Lorenco Marques, Mozambique; Port Louis, Mauritius, Cochin, India, Karachi, Pakistan; Bahrain; Massawa, Ethiopia; Mombasa, Kenya; Assah, Ethiopia; Bandar Abbas, Iran; Bushire, Iran; Kuwait; and Dakar, Senegal-touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XI." Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of antisubmarine and antiaircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.

Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk. After post-deployment leave and upkeep, she headed to Davisville, R.I., on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Va., from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.

At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area-for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfer to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaquis (D-212).

Stickell (DD-888) earned six battle stars for Korean War service and one for service in the Vietnam War.


Military

Stickell (DD-888) was laid down on 5 January 1945 at Orange, Tex., by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp. launched on 16 June 1945, sponsored by Miss Sue Stickell and commissioned on 31 October 1945, Comdr. Francis E. Fleck in command.

for a month, 10 December 1945 to 11 January 1946. She then conducted shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, before arriving in Charleston, S.C., on 11 March for post-shakedown availability. She shifted to Norfolk, Va., on 21 April and, until 6 May, supported carrier qualifications from that port with Kearsarge (CV-33). She then screened Kearsarge to Guantanamo Bay and, from there, to the Panama Canal. She returned to Norfolk on 13 June. Two days later, she got underway for the west coast. Heading via the Panama Canal, she reached San Diego, Calif., on 29 June and joined Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 11. Over the next four and one-half years, Stickell made three cruises to the Far East to serve with the 7th Fleet. During these deployments, she visited the Philippines, the Marianas, Japan, China, and Okinawa. After each tour of duty in the western Pacific, she returned to duty along the west coast and in Hawaiian waters. Drills and exercises occupied the bulk of her time during the postwar period.

On 6 November 1950, Stickell completed overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard and sailed for the Korean War Zone with DesDiv 52. She made Sasebo, Japan, on the 27th and, three days later, joined the screen of Task Force (TF) 77. The destroyer's first Korean War tour lasted until 20 July 1951. During that deployment, she operated with the fast carriers off the southern and eastern coasts of Korea, participated in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Yokosuka, Japan, conducted shore bombardments of the Songjin-Wonsan area and patrolled the waters off Shingjin, Yong-do and Chongjin for enemy small craft. In addition, she landed Republic of Korea intelligence teams on hostile shores: and she rescued three air crewmen while on lifeguard duty for the carriers. On 20 July 1951, she headed east toward the United States and arrived in San Diego, Calif., on 4 August.

For almost seven months, Stickell remained on the west coast, conducting training operations out of San Diego. On 26 January 1952, she put to sea for the Far East once again. After stopping at Yokosuka from 19 to 23 February, she began her second combat tour in Korean waters. Between 23 February and 19 March, she operated with TF 77 off the coast of Korea and made three shore bombardments, one off Yong-do on 28 February with Rochester (CA-124), one at the bombline on 5 March and one off Singchong-Ni on 11 March with Saint Paul (CA-73). On the 19th, Stickell and the rest of DesDiv 52 joined the United Nations blockading and escort force, Task Group (TG) 95.2. As the bombardment and patrol element, Stickell not only blockaded Hungnam, but also delivered interdiction and shore bombardment fire.

After bombarding Wonsan Harbor on 31 March, she rejoined TF 77 on 1 April and retired with that force to Yokosuka. She remained at Yokosuka during the first two weeks in April, then resumed support for TF 77 air strikes and intermittent shore bombardments. She was in Yokosuka from 29 May to 18 June for drydocking and repairs before conducting a brief operation along Korea's east coast, including a night landing in the vicinity of Pohang Dong. Stickell cleared the area on 23 June with DesDiv 52 for exercises out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa. The division returned to Yokosuka on 5 July and, on the 6th, was underway again to visit Hong Kong and to patrol the Taiwan Strait. She rendezvoused with Carrier Division 3 on the 14th and, with TG 50.3, conducted operations in the Philippines and in the South China Sea, before returning to the Taiwan area to rejoin TF 77 on the 27th. After further operations off the eastern coast of Korea, she entered Yokosuka on 6 August and, four days later, sailed for return to the United States.

Stickell arrived in San Diego on 26 August and remained there until 13 December, when she was decommissioned at Long Beach to begin conversion to a radar picket destroyer (DDR). On 2 September 1953 Stickell (DDR-888) was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. James Boyd in command. Following training out of Long Beach, she joined DesDiv 21 at San Diego on 18 January 1954. Two days later, she and her division headed for the western Pacific. This deployment consisted primarily of hunter-killer training and Taiwan Strait patrol. On 1 June, she departed Sasebo on a voyage to complete a circumnavigation of the globe. Along the way, she visited Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Kenya, South Africa, Brazil, and Trinidad. She reached Norfolk, Va., on 10 August 1954 and joined DesDiv 262 of the Atlantic Fleet.

For the next nine years, Stickell served the Atlantic Fleet as a radar destroyer. Between 1954 and 1958, she went through two complete training cycles, including yard overhauls, Mediterranean deployments refresher training, and NATO and Atlantic Fleet exercises. She received the latest in electronic equipment during her 1958 overhaul and, soon thereafter, she was outfitted with an experimental data processing and weapons analysis system. In 1961, she earned the Atlantic Fleet Destroyer force Antiair Warfare Trophy. Her seven-month Mediterranean cruise in 1962 was highlighted by an excursion into the Black Sea. In the fall of 1962, Stickell participated in the Cuban Quarantine and showed great efficiency by departing Norfolk on very short notice to assume her station.

In May 1963, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for a Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Stickell surrendered her antiaircraft warfare electronics equipment in return for the latest in ASW gear, including ASROC missiles and DASH helicopters. Early in 1964, she rejoined the Atlantic Fleet in Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 12 as a straight DD. Home ported at Newport, R.I., she became the flagship of DesDiv 122. Following refresher training in April, she became a unit of the midshipman training squadron and made a cruise to northern European ports in June and July. From August to November, she served with the Atlantic Antisubmarine Warfare Forces then she deployed to the Mediterranean until March 1965.

She returned to Newport and, in April, shifted to Norfolk to complete her DASH outfitting. In June, Stickell joined TF 124, in supporting United States and other OAS forces operating in the Dominican Republic during the 1965 upheavals in that country. After five weeks of patrolling, she entered the Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard at Boston, Mass., for a six week overhaul. In October, she took station off the west coast of Africa to participate in the recovery of Gemini 6. However, the mission was scrubbed, and Stickell returned, via Martinique, to Newport. In November and early December, she participated in amphibious exercises at Vieques Island, near Puerto Rico then returned to Newport.

On 19 January 1966, Stickell, along with the other units of Destroyer Squadron 12, departed Newport for duty with the 7th Fleet in the Far East. After transiting the Panama Canal and brief stops at San Diego and Pearl Harbor, the ship commenced wartime operations in the South China Sea in support of the Republic of South Vietnam. While attached to the 7th Fleet, Stickell was assigned to Search and Rescue (SAR) and helicopter inflight refueling duties in the Tonkin Gulf plane guarding for various attack carriers, especially Ranger ( CVA-61), and gunfire support duties. During the deployment, the ship visited the following Far East ports: Kaohsinng, Formosa Yokosuka, Japan Subic Bay, Philippines Hong Kong and Naha, Okinawa. En route back to Newport completely circumnavigating the world Stickell visited Port Dickson, Malaya Cochin, India and Aden. She transited the Suez and touched at Athens, Greece Palma, Mallorca, and Gibraltar. The ship returned to Newport on 17 August 1966.

1967 and headed toward Guantanamo Bay for refresher training. Stickell then headed for Culebra Island where she qualified as a naval gunfire support ship. After a short inport period, Stickell deployed on a four month ASW cruise. During the northern European segment of the cruise, Stickell visited Bergen Norway Aarjus, Denmark Sundsvall, Sweden and Thurso, Scotland. She operated with ships and aircraft from the navies of Norway, Denmark, West Germany Great Britain, and France. Stickell then entered the Mediterranean Sea and joined the 6th Fleet. She operated with Essex (CVS-9) and several other destroyers as a "pouncer" ASW Task Force. While in the Mediterranean, Stickell visited Naples, Italy Valletta, Malta, and Palermo, Sicily. On 19 September 1967, she steamed past Brenton Reef Light and was home again.

Before the end of the year, Stickell participated in two ASW exercises. The first, "Canus Silex," a combined Canadian-United States ASW exercise and the second, "Fixwex India." By February 1968, Stickell was preparing for a visit to the Caribbean and her part in "Springboard 68." After leaving frozen Newport behind, Stickell participated in a variety of training operations designed to sharpen her crew's already finely honed efficiency. Following Springboard, she acted as sonar training ship at the Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida.

The next several months were spent preparing for Stickell's next deployment. On 2 July 1968, Stickell left Newport for a six-month, 13-nation cruise of the Indian Ocean as part of the Navy's Middle East Force. She visited San Juan, Puerto Rico Recife, Brazil Luanda, Angola Lorenco Marques, Mozambique Port Louis, Mauritius, Cochin, India, Karachi, Pakistan Bahrain Massawa, Ethiopia Mombasa, Kenya Assah, Ethiopia Bandar Abbas, Iran Bushire, Iran Kuwait and Dakar, Senegal touching some ports more than once. While in the Persian Gulf area, Stickell participated in the international naval exercise "Middlinx XI." Together with units of the United States, British, and Iranian navies, Stickell once again demonstrated her readiness in the fields of antisubmarine and antiaircraft warfare. Stickell returned home on 10 January 1969.

Over the next three years, Stickell alternated deployments with operations off the east coast of the United States and in the Caribbean Sea. She was deployed to the Mediterranean again from September 1969 until late March 1970, when she returned to Norfolk. After post-deployment leave and upkeep, she headed to Davisville, R.I., on 18 May for a month of hull repairs. Back in Norfolk again on 20 June, she remained there, except for two brief operations with John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) in July, until 9 November when she got underway to off-load ammunition at Yorktown, in preparation for drydocking at Newport News, Va., from 13 November until 7 December. For the remainder of the year, she prepared for deployment to the Indian Ocean. Her second deployment with the Middle Eastern Force began on 7 January 1971, when she put to sea from Norfolk and ended on 29 June, upon her return to Norfolk. In the meantime she visited ports in Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Bahrein, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, Iran, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Senegal.

At the end of this, her last, deployment, Stickell remained in the Virginia Capes area for the most part at anchor or in port. She spent most of the remainder of 1971 and the first half of 1972 preparing for decommissioning and transfer to the government of Greece. On 1 July 1972, Stickell was decommissioned and struck from the Navy list. Immediately thereafter, the Greek Navy took possession of her and recommissioned her as Kanaris (D-212).

Stickell (DD-888) earned six battle stars for Korean War service and one for service in the Vietnam War.


Kanaris (D-212) (Greek Κανάρης) was the second ship in the Hellenic Navy with this name (the first was Kanaris (L51), the former HMS Hatherleigh, a Hunt III-class destroyer transferred to Greece from the Royal Navy in 1941) was named for Admiral Constantine Kanaris (1793–1877), a fire ship captain in the Greek War of Independence, and later Prime Minister of Greece. She commissioned into the Hellenic Navy (Greek Navy) on 1 July 1972 at Norfolk, Virginia, by Cdr. K. Zografos HN. After sea trials and training she sailed to Greece where she arrived on 29 March 1973. She served in the Hellenic Navy for 20 years as part of the Destroyers Command Force. She performed many patrols in the Aegean Sea participated in Greek and NATO exercises and had active participation in the conflicts with Turkey in 1974 and 1987.

The Ship's Badge depicts the hand of a fire ship captain holding the torch used to set on fire the fire ship, while the fireship sails toward an Ottoman flagship during Greek War of Independence, the same badge used for the later frigate bearing the same name.

Kanaris was decommissioned on 15 September 1993, and sold for scrap in 2002.

Kanaris (D-212) shortly before her decommissioning in September 1993


USS Stickell

When was the last time you checked to see as the VA has updated the list. Also you don’t have to prove you were in the brown water as you can now prove you were in the blue water with in 12 miles off the coast of Vietnam.

The Fire was in 1971, also google your ship and Google Navy ship logs.

Are you already service connected with any conditions?

What conditions are you wanting to try and get service connected now?

Agent Orange is not claimable, it’s the conditions caused from AO. Heart disease, Diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, Prostate Cancer, Skin Cancer, Parkinson’s Disease. If you have any of these then you can claim them with the right evidence.

Current diagnosis, copies of all medical records as best you can showing earliest diagnoses, and have your treating Dr. Make a short statement stating whatever conditions you have were caused by AO.

Example: veterans diabetes is as likely as not caused by his exposure to AO. You can also have the Dr. write it in your treatment notes.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Jan 12, 2020 #3 2020-01-13T01:30

Welcome. Please begin a new thread in which is a different topic.

Recommend you review a book titled “Vietnam: Naval and Riverine Weapons” by Philip Gutzman. It may use some official references to prove your case.

I’d be curious as to what your decision rating says in its denial.

Jan 12, 2020 #4 2020-01-13T02:30

"On August 22, 2019, the VA began scanning more than 20 million images from the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard deck logs so that they can be made available online. While the scanning project is underway, U.S. Navy and Coast Guard deck logs from 1956 to 1978 will be closed to researchers."

Nick
USAF RETIRED
100% P&T
100% CRSC

Complete layman - not a VSO and not a VA employee.

Jan 13, 2020 #5 2020-01-13T09:02

Jan 13, 2020 #6 2020-01-13T09:28

Jan 13, 2020 #7 2020-01-13T09:31

Jan 13, 2020 #8 2020-01-13T13:13

Jan 13, 2020 #9 2020-01-13T14:31

Jan 13, 2020 #10 2020-01-13T15:39

Here is a link to crewmen aboard the ship . Maybe you can meet up with another crewman there & possible get a buddy letter, etc., etc.
https://www.navysite.de/crewlist/comman . tyear=1945

Jan 13, 2020 #11 2020-01-13T21:04

Jan 13, 2020 #12 2020-01-13T21:25

Jan 13, 2020 #13 2020-01-13T21:34

Mar 06, 2020 #14 2020-03-07T01:42

Not to sound glib to any degree, but maintaining the storage of military records is not a responsibility of the VA. For your quest, you need only look toward the records held by the Navy Department (maybe) and the National Archives, which I'll explain in some detail.

There are a couple specific things to get the proof you are seeking to show your ship, with you aboard, were within the Territorial Waters of the former South Vietnam, which I’ll list below:

1. National Archives – USS Stickell (DD888) Deck Logs for June 26, 27 & 28, 1966, these were the only dates showing Stickell on NGFS . Email request for these documents to [email protected] . It will cost a few bucks but you'll need, in all probability, the position of the ship in conjunction with the CONGA data you’ll need (below) which could well place your ship within the 12 mile limit, and they are available.


On those dates, Stickell was part of Operation Jay, an amphibious landing by US Marines and 1 st ARVN forces. A DD can’t support an amphibious landing with only 5”x 38cal guns out 12+ n. Miles from the beach! Time lost getting to the beach setting up for a call for fire could very well mean more telegrams back home.


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Product Description

USS Stickell DD 888

World Cruise

January 1954 - August 1954 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

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A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Stickell DD 888 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: San Diego, Honolulu, Midway Island, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Kaohsiung Taiwan, Hong Kong, Kobe, Singapore, Columbo, Durban South Africa, Capetown S.A., Rio de Janeiro Brasil, trinidad Spain and Norfolk.
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Crossing the Equator
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Over 155 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

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  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
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    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

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    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
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    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
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    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

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    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

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    Stickell DD- 888 - History

    1958 , September, NEOSHO participated in "Operation Argus" where US Navy Task Force 88 conducted three High-Altitude Nuclear Explosions.

    Many tests were conducted across the next month in preparation for another Mediterranean Cruise beginning on September 8. The first exercise would be a North Atlantic Nato Exercise "Peace Keeper" and then on to a six month deployment with the U.S. Sixth Fleet. Ships leaving with her were the USS Sampson (DDG 10), USS Johnston (DD 821), USS Mc Card (DD 822) and the USS Semmes (DDG 18). USS Stickell (DD 888) and USS Waldron (DD 699) joined the formation on the 10th of September and Commander Second Fleet, embarked in the USS Newport News (CA 148) assumed duties as SOPA. USS Neosho (AO 143) provided fuel services.

    The cruise had been perfect until 16-17 September when the Atlantic reared it's ugly head sending one of it's infamous storms down the formation. The storm scattered the formation and opened a hole in Cone's main decks allowing water to pour into the after living compartment on every roll the ship took. The hole was patched early morning of 17 September, the day when "Peace Keeper" began. Finally the storm subsided and Cone returned to the exercise area on 19 September after having been driven far to the south.

    1965 , 29 August, Gemini 5 made retrofire on revolution 120 (one revolution early due to a threatening tropical storm near the landing area) at 7:27:42 a.m. EST on . Splashdown occurred at 7:55:13 in the western Atlantic at 29.73 N, 69.75 W after a total mission time of 190:55:14. Splashdown was 169 km short of the target due to a ground-based computer program error. The crew arrived onboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lake Champlain at 9:26 and the spacecraft was recovered at 11:50. USS Neosho AO-143 was there in support of the task force.

    1973 , 29 May USS NEWPORT NEWS steamed south for LANTREDEX 3-73 and port visits in Roosevelt Roads and San Juan, Puerto Rico and New York City. Damage control drills and General Quarters were held during the transit and USS NEWPORT NEWS refueled from USS NEOSHO (AO 143) on the 31st.

    1977 , 10 June USS America CV-66 sailed from Hampton Roads for a five-week South Atlantic deployment as a unit of TG 20.4. Other ships in company included USS South Carolina (CGN-37), USS Claude V. Ricketts (DLG-5), USS Dupont (DD- 941 ), and USS Neosho (AO-143).

    1981, 1 JuneUSS NITRO is badly damaged by a fire in the machinery room while en route to Athens, Greece. NITRO is taken under tow the next day by USNS NEOSHO (T-AO 143) for Souda Bay. 60 nautical miles northeast of Souda Bay, Greece

    1985 , 8 July Arthur Radford - DD-968, Stopping for fuel at Mina Raysut, Oman, on 8 July 1985, Arthur W. Radford transited the Strait of Bab el Mandeb in company with Antrim on 10 July, and the two warships conducted freedom of navigation operations off the coast of the Democratic People's Republic of Yemen on the 11th. The destroyer transited the Suez Canal on the 14th, and replenished from the oiler USNS Neosho (T-AO-143) that same day. Fueling from USNS Truckee (T-AO-144) the following day, Arthur W. Radford conducted a port visit to Benidorm, Spain, from 20 to 23 July before reaching Rota on the 24th. Proceeding thence with Antrim, Barney, and Charles F. Adams, the destroyer sailed for Norfolk on 24 July. After visiting Ponta Delgada, in the Azores, and Bermuda, en route, Arthur W. Radford reached her on 5 August 1985.

    1990 , Spring time, Neosho was assigned to deliver supplies to the embassy in Sierra Leone and the Marines who were positioned off the coast of Liberia shortly after arriving in the Med. There was a civil war or something going on. Neosho actually dropped anchor in Sierra Leone . Operation Desert storm happened towards the end of the deployment. Two or maybe three trips were made down the coast of Africa.

    Location "1", June 1, Strats of Gibraltar, shows dolphins, signals from the bridge, a helicopter landing plus some of the crew driving east to Gibralter.

    Location "2", August 8, Eisenhower CVN-69 convoy passing through Bitter Lake. Ships include: Scott DDG-995, John L. Hall FFG-32, Suribachi AE-21,
    Tinconderoga CG-47 and of course Neosho AO-143

    Location "3", August 14, Djibouti harbor plus a link to the "Largest Crack on Earth"

    Location "4", August 18,19 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower CVN-69 page, UNREP with Suribachi at night, plane flights, signal flags and helicopter.

    Location "5" , August 24, Port of Suez, the southern end of Suez Canal.

    Location "6" , September 4, Neosho made port at Sarroch Oil Refinery on the Italian Island of Sardonia.
    September 11, They also had an incidfent where their a launch lost power. Sited RoRo ship type Cape I Class .

    Location "7" , September 18, Neosho enters port of Cartagena, Spain, Here she receives some needed new paint, etc. The city has history of the Roman occupation
    and WWII Forts. October 8, she prepares to head back east into the mediterranean.

    Location "8" , October 22, Muster of Signalmen, UNREP with USS Rigel AF-58, UNREP with USS Thomas C. Hunt DE-1092, UNREP with USS Biddle CG-34 and
    on October 25, a tour of the ship, including the captains quarters where he demonstrates his steam powered tractor that he made.

    Location "9" , November 2, site volcano Etna, UNREP with USS Yellowstone AD-4, November 4, view USS John F. Kennedy CVN-67 aircraft landings and head home.
    .
    2005 , Neosho is sold for $1.00 to International Shipbreaking Limited, Brownsville, TX

    Cdr. Charles Z. Hanus USN , Executive Officer USS NEOSHO (AO-143).


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    This photo of USS Stickell DD 888 personalized print on canvas is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x10″ or 11″x14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

    We PERSONALIZE your print of the USS Stickell DD 888 with your name, rank and years served and there is no ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

    United States Navy Sailor
    YOUR NAME HERE
    Proudly Served: Your Years Here

    This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

    The watermark “Great Naval Images” will NOT be on your print.

    Media Type Used:

    The USS Stickell DD 888 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

    We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


    Stickell DD- 888 - History

    January 1954 - August 1954 Cruise Book

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Stickell DD 888 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Ports of Call: San Diego, Honolulu, Midway Island, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Kaohsiung Taiwan, Hong Kong, Kobe, Singapore, Colombo, Durban South Africa, Cape town S.A., Rio de Janeiro Brazil , Trinidad Spain and Norfolk .
    • Divisional Group Photos with Names
    • Crossing the Equator
    • Many Crew Activity Photos
    • Plus Much More

    Over 155 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

    Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.


    Our Newsletter

    Product Description

    USS Stickell DD 888

    "Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

    (Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

    Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It helps to show your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed).

    The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

    The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

    We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

    United States Navy Sailor
    YOUR NAME HERE
    Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

    This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

    The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

    This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

    Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

    We guarantee you will not be disappointed with this item or your money back. In addition, We will replace the canvas print unconditionally for FREE if you damage your print. You would only be charged a nominal fee plus shipping and handling.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these prints have been very satisfied.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Be sure to add us to your !

    Thanks for looking!


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    Watch the video: 1951 Korean War Navy Carrier Operations (May 2022).