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MONDAY, June 9 - History

MONDAY, June 9 - History



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Mr. LUTHER MARTIN, from Maryland, took his seat.

In Committee of the Whole, —Mr. GERRY, according to previous notice given by him, moved " that the national Executive should be elected by the Executives of the States, whose proportion of votes should be the same with that allowed to the States, in the election of the Senate." If the appointment should be made by the National Legislature, it would lessen that independence of the Executive, which ought to prevail; would give birth to intrigue and corruption between the Executive and Legislature previous to the election, and to partiality in the Executive afterwards to the friends who promoted him. Some other mode, therefore, appeared to him necessary. He proposed that of appointing by the State Executives, as most analagous to the principle observed in electing the other branches of the National Government; the first branch being chosen by the people of the States and the second by the Legislatures of the States, he did not see any objection against letting the Executive be appointed by the Executives of the States. He supposed the Executives would be most likely to select the fittest men, and that it would be their interest to support the man of their own choice.

Mr. RANDOLPH urged strongly the inexpediency of Mr. GERRY'S mode of appointing the National Executive. The confidence of the people would not be secured by it to the National magistrate. The small States would lose all chance of an appointment from within themselves. Bad appointments would be made, the Executives of the States being little conversant with characters not within their own small spheres. The State Executives, too, notwithstanding their constitutional independence, being in fact dependent on the State Legislatures, will generally be guided by the views of the latter, and prefer either favorites within the States, or such as it may be expected will be most partial to the interests of the State. A national Executive thus chosen will not be likely to defend with becoming vigilance and firmness the national rights against State encroachments. Vacacancies also must happen. How can these be filled? He could not suppose, either, that the Executives would feel the interest in supporting the national Executive which had been imagined. They will not cherish the great oak whi¢h is to reduce them to paltry shrubs.

On the question for referring the appoitment of the national Executive to the State Executives, as proposed by Mr. GERRY, — Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virgmia, South Carolina, Georgia, no; Delaware, divided.

Mr. PATTERSON moved, that the Committee resuine the clause relating to the rule of suffrage in the National Legislature.

Mr. BREARLY seconds him. He was sorry, he said, that any question on this point was brought into view. It had been much agitated in Congress at the time of forming the Confederation, and was then rightly settled by allowing to each sovereign State an equal vote. Otherwise, the smaller States must have been destroyed instead of being saved. The substitution of a ratio, he admitted, carried fairness on the face of it; but on a deeper examination was unfair and unjust. Judging of the disparity of the States by the quota of Congress, Virginia would have sixteen votes, and Georgia but one. A like proportion to the others will make the whole number ninety. There will be three large States, and ten small ones. The large States, by which he meant Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Virginia, will carry every thing before them. It had been admitted, and was known to him from facts within New Jersey that where large and small counties were united into a district for electing representatives for the district, the large counties always carried their point, and consequently the States would do so. Virginia with her sixteen votes will be a solid column indeed, a formidable phalanx. While Georgia with her solitary vote, and the other little States, will be obliged to throw themselves constantly into the scale of some large one, in order to have any weight at all. He had come to the Convention with a view of being as useful as he could, in giving energy and stability to the Federal Government. When the proposition for destroying the equality of votes came forward, he was astonished, he was alarmed. Is it fair, then; it will be asked, that Georgia should have an equal vote, with Virginia? He would not say it was. What remedy, then? One only, that a map of the United States be spread out, that all the existing boundaries be erased, and that a new partition of the whole be made into thirteen equal parts.

Mr. PATTERSON considered the proposition for a proportional representation as striking at the existence of the lesser States. He would premise, however, to an investigation of this question, some remarks on the nature, structure, and powers of the Convention. The Convention, he said, was formed in pursuance of an act of Congress; that this act was recited in several of the commissions, particularly that of Massachusetts, which he required to be read; that the amendment of the Confederacy was the object of all the laws and commissions on the subject; that the Articles of the Confederation were therefore the proper basis of all the proceedings of the Convention; that we ought to keep within its limits, or we should be charged by our constituents with usurpation; that the people of America were sharp-sighted, and not to be deceived. But the commissions under which we acted were not only the measure of our power, they denoted also the sentiments of the States on the subject of our deliberation. The idea of a National Government, as contradistinguished from a federal one, never entered into the mind of any of them; and to the public mind we must accommodate ourselves. We have no power to go beyond the Federal scheme; and if we had, the people are not ripe for any other. We must follow the people; the people will not follow us. The proposition could not be maintained, whether considered in reference to us as a nation, or as a confederacy. A confederacy supposes sovereignty in the members composing it, and sovereignty supposes equality. If we are to be considered as a nation, all State distinctions must be abolished, the whole must be thrown into hotchpot, and when an equal division is made, then there may be fairly an equality of representation. He held up Virginia, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, as the three large States, and the other ten as small ones; repeating the calculations of Mr. BREARLY, as to the disparity of votes which would take place, and affirming that the small States would never agree to it. He said there was no more reason that a great individual State, contributing much, should have more votes than a small one, contributing little, than that a rich individual citizen should have more votes than an indigent one. If the rateable property of A was to that of as forty to one, ought A for that reason to have forty times as many votes as B? Such a principle would never be admitted; and if it were admitted would put B entirely at the mercy of A. As A has more to be protected than B, so he ought tn contribute more for the common protection. The same may be said of a large State, which has more to be protected than a small one. Give the large States an influence in proportion to their magnitude, and what will be the consequence? Their ambition will be proportionally increased, and the small States will have every thing to fear. It was once proposed by Galloway, and some others, that America should be represented in the British Parliament, and then be bound by its laws. America could not have been entitled to more than one-third of the representatives which would fall to the share of Great Britain, would American rights and interests have been safe under an authority thus constituted? It has been said that if a national Government is to be formed, so as to operate on the people and not on the States, the Representatives ought to be drawn from the people. But why so? May not a Legislature, filled by the State Legislatures, operate on the people who choose the State Legislatures? Or may not a practicable coercion be found? He admitted that there were none such in the existing system. He was attached strongly to the plan of the existing Confederacy, in which the people choose their legislative representatives; and the Legislatures their federal representa tives. No other amendments were wanting than to mark the orbits of the States with due precision, and provide for the use of coercion, which was the great point. He alluded to the hint thrown out by Mr. WILSON, of the necessity to which the large States might be reduced, of confederating among themselves, by a refusal of the others to concur. Let them unite if they please, but let them remember that they have no authority to compel the others to unite. New Jersey will never confederate on the plan before tthe Committee. She would be swallowed up. He had rather submit to a monarch, to a despot, than to such a fate. He would not only oppose the plan here, but on his return home do every thing in his power to defeat it there.

Mr. WILSON hoped, if the Confederacy should be dissolved, that a majority, —nay, a minority of the States would unite for their safety. He entered elaborately into the defence of a proportional representation, stating for his first position, that, as all authority was derived from the people, equal numbers of people ought to have an equal number of representatives, and different numbers of people, different numbers of representatives. This principle had been improperly violated in the Confederation, owing to the urgent circumstances of the time. As to the case of A and B stated by Mr. PATTERSON, he observed, that, in districts as large as the States, the number of people was the best measure of their comparative wealth. Whether, therefore, wealth or numbers was to form the ratio it would be the same. Mr. PATTERSON admitted persons, not property, to be the measure of suffrage. Are not the citizens of Pennsylvania equal to those of New Jersey? Does it require one hundred and fifty of the former to balance fifty of the latter? Representatives of different districts ought clearly to hold the same proportion to each other, as their respective constituents hold to each other. If the small States will not confederate on this plan, Pennsylvania, and he presumed some other States, would not confederate on any other. We have been told that each State being sovereign, all are equal. So each man is naturally a sovereign over himself, and all men are therefore naturally equal. Can he retain this equality when he becomes a member of civil government? He cannot. As little can a sovereign State, when it becomes a member of a federal government. If New Jersey will not part with her sovereignty, it is vain to talk of government. A new partition of the States is desirable, but evidently and totally impracticable.

Mr. WILLIAMSON illustrated the cases by a comparison of the different States to counties of different sizes within the same State; observing that proportional representation was admitted to be just in: the latter case, and could

The question being about to be put, Mr. PATTERSON hoped that as so much depended on it, it might be thought best to postpone the decision till to-morrow; which was done, nem. con.

The Committee rose, and the House adjourned.


New Orleans Saints tackle  Terron Armstead  attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.

New Orleans Saints tackle Terron Armstead attended the ribbon cutting ceremony of the first Scholars Education center location in New Orleans on June 11, 2021.


Wednesday, June 9, 2021

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June 2021 Monthly Holidays

June 2021 Weekly Holidays


International Clothesline Week: 5-12 (First Sat-Sun Week)
National Lemonade Days: 5-13 Link
Bedbug Awareness Week: 6-12 Link
Black Single Parents Week: 6-12 (First Full Week)
End Mountain Top Removal Week: 6-12 Link (First Full Week)
National Automotive Service Professionals Week: 6-12 (Week That has the 12th In It)
National Business Etiquette Week: 6-12 (First Full Week)
National Headache Awareness Week: 6-12 Link (First Full Week)
Pet Appreciation Week: 6-12 (First Full Week) Link
Duct Tape Days: 10-12 Link Cancelled
Great American Brass Band Week: 11-12 Link
Westminster Dog Show: 12-13 Link (Moved from February) Not open to the public!
National Flag Week: 13-19 (Always has 14th in it)
*National Hermit Week: 13-20
National Pet Wedding Week: 13-19 (2nd Full Week) Link
National Right of Way Professionals Week: 13-19 Link (Second Full Week)
National Waste & Recycling Workers Week: 13-19 Link (Always has the 17th in it which is Garbage Man Day.)
Bartender of The Year Week: 14-17 ? Link
Meet A Mate Week: 14-20
Men's Health Week: 14-20 Link Link (Always ends on Father's Day)
US Open Golf Championship: 14-20
Royal Ascot: 15-19 Link
Community Health Improvement Week (CHI): 16-18 Link

* National Week of Making: 17-23 Link
National Nursing Assistants Week: 17-24 Link (Thursday to Thursday)
Waste and Recycling Workers Week: 17-23 Link
US Police and Fire Championships: 10-19 Link
Animal Rights Awareness Week: 20-26 Link (3rd Week) Link
Greencare For Troops Awareness Week: 20-26
National Play Catch Week: 20-26 (3rd Week)
Old Time Fiddlers Week: 20-26 Link
Carpenter Ant Awareness Week: 20-26 (Last Full Week)
Fish Are Friends, Not Food! Week: 20-26 Link (Last Week)
Lightning Safety Awareness Week: 20-26 Link (Last Full Week)
National Craft Spirits Week: 20-26 Link (3rd Week)
National Mosquito Control Awareness Week: 20-26 Link (Always on the week that has 26th)
Universal Father's Week: 20-26 (3rd Full Week)
National Insect Week: 21-27

National Pollinator Week: 21-27 Link ( Begins the Monday after Father's Day)
Old Time Fiddlers Week: 21-26 (3rd Week)
American Library Week: 24-29
World Hula Week: 24-26 Link (Moved from April)

Watermelon Thump Seed Spitting Week: 24-27 Link (Last Weekend Thurs. to Sun.)
Water Ski Days: 25-27 (Last Full Weekend)
Tour de France: 26-7/18 Link
*National Prevention of Eye Injuries Awareness: 27 -7/4
Windjammer Days: 27-7/3 Link
National Tire Safety Week: 28-7/4 Link

June 2021 Daily Holidays

*Baby Boomers Recognition Day: 1
*CNN Day: 1
*Global Day of Parents: 1 Link
*Heimlich Maneuver Day: 1
*International IGBO Day: 1
*International Table Top Day: 1 Link

*National Dare Day: 1 Link (Note: Different than one in April for Drugs)
*National Go Barefoot Day: 1
*National Nailpolish Day: 1 Link
*National Olive Day: 1 Link
*National Pen Pal Day: 1 Link
*Oscar The Grouch Day: 1 Link
*Say Something Nice Day: 1 Link
*Stand For Children Day: 1 Link
*Superman's Birthday: 1 (Comic Book) Note: See also Feb. 29, June 18, Dec. 1
*World Milk Day: 1 Link
*World Narcissistic Abuse Day: 1 Link
*World Reef Awareness Day: 1 Link

Global Running Day: 2 Link Link (First Wednesday)
Leave The Office Early Day: 2 (Note: If June 2 falls on the weekend, then observed on closest workday)
*National Bubba Day: 2
*National Gun Violence Awareness Day: 2
*National Rotisserie Chicken Day: 2 Link

*St. Erasmus Day: 2
National Tailors Day: 2 (First Wednesday)

*Yell "Fudge" at the Cobras in North America Day: 2

*Chimborazo Day: 3
*National Stuffed Shrimp Scholars Day: 3 Link

*Wonder Woman Day: 3 Link
*World Bicycle Day: 3 Link
*World Clubfoot Day: 3 Link

*Audacity To Hope Day: 4
Banana Split Days: 4-5 Link
Doughnut Day or Donut Day: 4-5 Link (First Fri.-Sat. in June) [Salvation Army]
*Hug Your Cat Day: 4 Link
Horseradish Days: 4-6 Link (First Weekend)
*International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression: 4
*International (World) Hug Your Cat Day: 4 Link
*National Clean Beauty Day: 4 Link
National Gun Violence Awareness Day: 4 (First Friday)
*National Punk Day: 4 Link
*National SAFE Day: 4 Link
*Old Maid's Day: 4 Link

*Apple II Day: 5
Artichoke Days: 5-6 Link (Moved from May)
*Baby Boomers Recognition Day: 5
Belmont Stakes: 5 Link
Do-Dah Parade Day: 5 (Kalamazo,Mi - First Saturday)
Drawing Day or Pencil Day: 5 (First Saturday)
*Festival of Popular Delusions Day: 5 Link
*Hot Air Balloon Day: 5
National Black Bear Day: 5 (First Saturday) Link
National Bubbly Day: 5 Link (First Saturday)
*National Moonshine Day: 5
National Play Outside Day: 5 Link (First Saturday)
National Prairie Day: 5
(First Saturday)
National Trails Day: 5 (First Saturday)
*National Veggie Burgers Day: 5 Link
The Wicket World of Croquet Day: 5 Link (First Saturday)
Turtle Races Day: 5 (First Saturday)
*World Environment Day: 5

*Atheists Pride Day: 6 Link
Children's Awareness Memorial Day: 6 (First Sunday)
*D-Day: 6
*Drive-in Movie Day: 6
*National Eyewear Day: 6 Link
National Animal Rights Day: 6 (First Sunday) Link
National Cancer Survivors Day: 6 Link (First Sunday)
*National Higher Education Day: 6 (Note: Colleges in US observe on different dates)
*Russian Language Day: 6 Link
*YMCA Day: 6 (Organization, not the song.)
*YoYo Day: 6 Link (Always on the Birthday of Donald Duncan)


*(Daniel) Boone Day: 7
National Thank God It's Monday Day: 7 (First Monday)

*VCR Day: 7

Call Your Doctor Day: 8 Link (2nd Tuesday)
*Ghostbusters Day: 8 Link
*National Caribbean American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day: 8 Link
*Upsy Daisy Day: 8
World APS Day: 8 Link
*World Oceans Day: 8 Link
World Pet Memorial Day: 8 (2nd Tuesday)


*Donald Duck Day: 9 (Birthday) Link (See Also March 13)
*International Archives Day: 9
*National Earl Baltes Day: 9 Link
*Toy Industry Day: 9

*Alcoholics Anonymous (Founders) Day: 10
*Ball Point Pen Day: 10
*Iced Tea Day: 10 Link Note: June 10, 1904 was a Friday.
*National Egg Roll Day: 10 Link
*Race Unity Day: 10

*Corn on the Cob Day: 11
*National Cotton Candy Day: 11 Link
*National Making Life Beautiful Day: 11 Link
Poultry Days: 11-13 Link (2nd full weekend)


*Crowded Nest Awareness Day: 12
Family Fitness and Health Day: 12 (Second Saturday) (Formerly in September)
International Young Eagles Day: 12 (Second Saturday)
*Loving Day: 12 Link Link
Missing Mutts Awareness Day: 12 Link (Second Saturday)
*National Jerky Day: 12
National Marina Day: 12 (Second Saturday)
*National Peanut Butter Cookie Day: 12 Link
National Rose' (wine) Day: 12 Link (Second Saturday) (Note: International Rose' Day is further down on June 28)
Queen's Official Birthday: 12 (On A Saturday) Link (aka Trooping of The Colours) Cancelled.
Record Store Day: 12 Link (and July 17)
*Victims of Orlando, Florida Attack Day: 12 Link
World Bike Naked Day: 12 Link Link (Second Saturday) (Note: Different Cities Have Different Dates. They bike all summer long.)
*World Day Against Child Labor: 12 Link
World Gin Day: 12 Link (Second Saturday)
Worldwide Knit (and Crotchet) in Public Day: 12 Link

Abused Women and Children's Awareness Day: 13 (Second Sunday)
Children's Sunday: 13 (Second Sunday)
*International Albinism Awareness Day: 13
Multicultural American Child Day: 13 (Second Sunday)
*National Doe B Day: 13 Link
*National Kitchen Klutzes of America Day: 13 Link
Race Unity Day: 13 (Second Sunday)
*Random Acts of Light: 13 Link
*Roller Coaster Day: 13

*Army's Birthday: 14
*Family History Day: 14
*Flag Day: 14
*Hydranencephaly Awareness Day: 14 Link
*International Bath Day: 14
*National Bourbon Day: 14 Link
*No Mailing Children Day: 14 Link
*Pause for the Pledge Day: 14
Ride To Work Day (Motorcycles) : 14 Link (Third Monday)
*(World) Blood Donor Day: 14 Link



*Global Wind Day: 15 Link
*Magna Carta Day: 15
*Native American Citizenship Day: 15
*Nature Photography Day: 15 Link
*National Day of Prayer for Law Enforcement Officers: 15
*National Lobster Day: 15 Link (Also September 25 Different Sponsor)
*Prune Day: 15
Royal Ascot: 15-19

*World Elder Abuse Awareness Day: 15 Link
*Worldwide Day of Giving: 15 Link

*Bloomsday: 16 Link
*Fudge Day: 16 Link
*Ladies' Day (Baseball): 16

Bartender Day: 17 Link (The Day They Crown The Winner of Bartender of The Year)
Dump The Pump Day: 17 Link (Third Thursday)
*National Garbage Man Day: 17 Link
National Career Nursing Assistants Day: 17 Link (Second Thursday of Full Week)
Recess At Work Day: 17 (Third Thursday)
*Stewarts Root Beer Day: 17
*World Day To Combat Desertification and Drought: 17
World Tapas Day: 17 Link (Third Thursday)
*World Tesselation Day: 17 Link

*Autistic Pride Day: 18 Link
*Clark Kent's Birthday (Superman): 18 (See also June 1, Feb. 19, Dec. 1) Link
Dollars Against Diabetes Day(s): 18-20 (Always Father's Day Weekend) Link
*International Sushi Day: 18
*Jack Herer Day: 18 Link
*National Black America's Day of Repentence: 18
National Flip Flop Day: 18 (3rd Friday) Link Link (Also 2/12 different sponsor)
*National Splurge Day: 18 (Since 1994)
*Sustainable Gasteronomy Day: 18
Take Back The Lunch Break Day: 18 Link (3rd Friday)
Ugliest Dog Day: 18
(Normally Third Friday) Link Link
Wear Blue Day: 18 Link (Friday of Men's Health Week)
[email protected] Father's Day: 18 (Friday Before Father's Day)


*Free BSD Day: 19 Link
*Garfield the Cat Day: 19
*International Day For The Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict: 19
International Surfing Day: 19 Link Link (3rd Saturday)
*Juneteenth: 19
Mermaid Day: 19 (Third Saturday)
National Library Legislative Day: 19-24 Link Cancelled
*National Watch Day: 19
Link
Polar Bear Swim: 19 (Nome,AK) Link (Do not confuse with Seward, AK in January.) On the closest Saturday to June 21 (Summer Solstice)
World Juggling Day: 19 (Saturday closest to the 17th) Link
*World Sickle Cell Day: 19 Link
*World Sauntering Day: 19

*American Eagle Day: 20 Link
*Anne and Samantha Day: 20 (On Summer & Winter solstices. Also December 21)
Family Awareness Day: 20 (Third Sunday)
Father's Day: 20 Link Link
*Flitch of Bacon Day: 20 Link Link
(Note: Ceremony is the day after a couple's anniversary. This is why dates vary. But, this date is listed on my site due to the last qualified ceremony on June 20, 1751. So, for over 103 years, June 20th was considered Flitch of Bacon Day. Then the ceremony was revived in 1854. But, the ceremony dates varied with each couple. Some were held in August.The ceremony is not annual.. But, I'm keeping June 20 as the official Flitch of Bacon Day since it was the traditional date for 103 years. So, you can celebrate on June 20 every year, or celebrate every four years on the date set up by the town of Dunmow in England where the ceremonies now take place.
PS: Here is a list of the most recent winners of 2012 at The Dunmow Flitch Trials website
If you want to apply for this prize, you can contact them at this site as well. Link)

*Global Orgasm Day: 20 (Always on Winter Solstice and Summer Solstice)
Husband Caregiver Day: 20 (Always on Fathers Day)
*International Nystagmus Awareness Day: 20 Link
*Lambrusco Day: 20 Link
Litha: 20
*National Hike With A Geek Day: 20 Link
*National Kouign Amann Day: 20 Link
*National Sea Shell Day: 20 Link (First day of Summer)
Midsummer: 20
Summer: 20-9/22
Summer Solstice: 20
Turkey Lovers Day: 20 Link (Third Sunday)
*World Productivity Day: 20
*World Refugee Day: 20
Ann & Samantha Day: 20 (Summer& Winter Solstices. Also Dec. 20) Link


*Cuckoo Warning Day: 21 (First Day of Summer)
*Go Skateboarding Day: 21 Link
*International Day of Yoga: 21 Link
*Make Music Day: 21 Link (There's another one in December)
*National Daylight Appreciation Day: 21
*National Day of The Gong: 21
National Energy Shopping Day: 21 (First Monday of Summer)
*National Selfie Day: 21 Link
*Tall Girl Appreciation Day: 21 (Longest Day of The Year)
*World Giraffe Day: 21 Link
*World Handshake Day: 21 Link
(Do not confuse with National Handshake Day - different sponsor on June 24)
*World Humanist Day: 21
*World Hydrography Day: 21 Link
*World Music Day: 21

*HVAC Technicians Day: 22 Link )
National Columnists Day: 22 (4th Tuesday)
*Positive Media Day: 22 Link
*Stupid Guy Thing Day: 22
*World Rainforest Day: 22 Link (Note: There is World Rainforest Week in October.)
*Worldwide VW Beetle Day: 22 Link


*International Widows' Day: 23 Link
*Let It Go Day: 23
*National Eat At A Food Truck Day: 23 Link (Note: Different Sponsor than National Food Truck Day listed Below on June 28)
*National Detroit-style Pizza Day: 23 Link
*National Hydration Day: 23 Link
*Pink Flamingo Day (Lawn Ornaments): 23 Link
*Public Service Day: 23
*Runner's Selfie Day: 23
*SAT Math Day: 23 Link
*Typing Day: 23



*Celebration of the Senses: 24
Festival of Goodwill, Festival of Christ & Humanity, World Invocation Day: 24 Link (On Full Moon)
*International Fairy Day or Faerie Day: 24 Link
National Bomb Pop Day: 24 Link (Last Thursday)
National Hand Shake Day: 24 (Last Thursday) (Different sponsor than World Handshake Day)
*Stonewall National Monument Day: 24 Link
*World UFO Day: 24 (Also July 2) Link


*Color TV Day (CBS): 25
*Day of The Seafarer: 25 Link
Drive Your Corvette to Work Day: 25 Link (Last Friday that's closest to June 30)
*Global Beatles Day: 25 Link
*Global Smurfs Day: 25 Link
International Rose' Day: 25 Link (4th Friday)
*Leon Day: 25 Link
*National Catfish Day: 25 Link
National Food Truck Day: 25 (Last Friday) Link Note: Different than Eat At A Food Truck Day always on June 23.
*National Police Community Cooperative Day: 25 Link
*School Prayer Banned Anniversary: 25
Take Your Dog To Work Day: 25 Link (First Friday after Father's Day)

ARRL (American Radio Relay League) Field Day: 26-27 Link
*626 Day (Lilo & Stitch): 26 Link
*Bar Code Day: 26
Great American Backyard Campout: 26 (Fourth Saturday)
*Harry Potter Day: 26
*International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking: 26
*International Day in Support of Victims of Torture: 26
*National Canoe Day: 26
*National Coconut Day: 26 Link
National Haskap Berry Day: 26 (Last Saturday)
*Same Sex Marriage Day: 26
Summersgiving: 26 Link (Saturday after the Summer Solstice)
Tour de France: 26-7/18

America's Kids Day: 27 (Fourth Sunday)
*Celebrate Joy Day: 27 Link
*Decide To Be Married Day: 27
Descendants Day: 27 (Last Sunday)
Fast of Tammuz: 27 Link
*"Happy Birthday To You" Day: 27
*Industrial Workers of The World Day: 27
Log Cabin Day: 27 (Last Sunday)
*Micro-, Small-, And Medium-Sized Enterprises Day: 27
*National HIV Testing Day: 27 Link
*National Onion Day: 27 Link
*National Sunglasses Day: 27 Link
*PTSD Awareness Day: 27 Link


*International Body Piercing Day: 28
*International Lightning Safety Day: 28
*National Logistics Day: 28 Link
Please Take My Children To Work Day: 28 (Last Monday)
*Tau Day: 28 Link


*International Day Of The Tropics: 29
*International Mud Day: 29 Link
*World Camera Day: 29 Link (Note: World Photography Day is in August.)
*World Scleroderma Day: 29 Link

*Asteroid Day: 30
*California Avocado Day: 30 Link
*Disabled Veterans Day: 30 Link
*Leap Second Time Adjustment Day: 30
(Note: This is listed as an observance title only. Some years scientists do not make adjustments.
But, if they do, then it's done on either June 30 or December 31.)
*National Meteor Watch Day: 30 Link
*National Outfit Of The Day Day: 30 Link (Note: You do not have to buy a holiday to create one. Just sayin')
National Parchment Cooking Day: 30 Link (Last Wednesday)
*NOW (National Organization For Women) Day: 30
*Social Media Day: 30
Link


This Day in History

  • 1042 - Edward the Confessor becomes King of England
  • 1783 - Laki, a volcano in Iceland starts an eight month eruption that kills over 9,000 people and starts a seven year famine
  • 1786 - Ice Cream is advertised for the 1st time in Mr. Hall, New York City
  • 1789 - James Madison introduces a proposed Bill of Rights in the U.S. House of Representatives, and another proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution becomes the 27th Amendment
  • 1824 - The washing machine is patented by Noah Cushing of Quebec
  • 1861 - The U.S. State of Tennessee votes to secede from the Union
  • 1906 - U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt signs the Antiquities Act into law, authorizing the President to restrict certain parcels of public land that have historical or conservation value
  • 1936 - The first parking meters are invented
  • 1953 - 116 are killed, 844 injured, and 340 homes destroyed after an F5 tornado touches down in Beecher, Michigan
  • 1953 - 113 are killed in Flint Michigan after 6 tornadoes touch down
  • 1968 - Assassinated U.S. Senator, Robert F. Kennedy's funeral takes place at the St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City and his body is laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery
  • 1992 - The first World Ocean Day is celebrated 
  • 1995 - The downed U.A. Air Force pilot Captain Scott O'Grady is rescued by U.S. Marines in Bosnia

Court again leaves Affordable Care Act in place

Statistics for OT2020

A surprising stat at this point in the term: Both Kagan and Breyer have been in the majority slightly more often than Alito.

Kavanaugh continues to have the highest rate (as he has for most of the term). Sotomayor has the lowest.

Still 15 cases left. So this could all change.

The first two pieces in our symposium on yesterday's decision in Fulton v. Philadelphia are up. First, @JimOleske dissects the decision in light of the court's shadow-docket ruling in Tandon v. Newsom, which took a very different approach to free exercise.

Fulton quiets Tandon’s thunder: A free exercise puzzle - SCOTUSblog

This article is the first entry in a symposium on the court’s decision in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia. .

Number of pages written by each justice in the five decisions handed down this week (majority opinions, concurrences, and dissents all included):

Kagan: 0
Barrett: 3
Kavanaugh: 11
Roberts: 15
Breyer: 16
Thomas: 25
Sotomayor: 27
Gorsuch: 28
Alito: 112

While today's decision in Fulton v. Philadelphia is a win for a Catholic group seeking to participate in the city's foster program, it stops short of the broad endorsement of religious freedom the challengers had hoped for. Here's @AHoweBlogger's analysis:

Court holds that city’s refusal to make referrals to faith-based agency violates Constitution - SCOTUSblog

In a clash between religious freedom and public policies that protect LGBTQ people, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

Now do we say that Sonia Sotomayor and the other liberals supported child slavery by all voting for Nestle today? Of course not. And Nestle’s lawyers like @Neal_katyal obviously don’t either. The cheap attacks on the court and thoughtful lawyers did not age well. -tg

The claim @nealkatyal was defending slavery is flat wrong & libelous. Here is what he actually said, which is the reverse: child slavery is abhorrent, criminal, horrific. Remember in a pending case he can't comment, so read what he really said in full.


The Bold and the Beautiful Spoilers: Monday, June 7 – Thomas Goes Ballistic Over Liam Killing Vinny – Murder Mystery Questions

The Bold and the Beautiful (B&B) spoilers for Monday, June 7, tease that Thomas Forrester (Matthew Atkinson) will go ballistic over Liam Spencer (Scott Clifton) killing Vinny Walker (Joe LoCicero), but murder mystery questions will follow.

B&B fans know Thomas has been seething about the hit-and-run driver ever since that tragic night. Thomas has repeatedly vowed to make the person responsible pay, but he never in a million years expected that person to be Hope Spencer’s (Annika Noelle) husband!

After Ridge Forrester (Thorsten Kaye) presumably hears the news of Liam’s guilt from Brooke Forrester (Katherine Kelly Lang), he’ll know he has to break it to Thomas.

The Bold and the Beautiful spoilers say Thomas’ shock will quickly turn to fury. It’ll be hard for Thomas to think straight with all the rage that’ll be burning through him.

Thomas’ best bud is dead, so he’ll blame Liam for that and will rant about Vinny being left on the side of the road. Of course, Ridge should explain that part was Bill Spencer’s (Don Diamont) fault.

That should give Thomas another reason to blow his top, which is to be expected under the circumstances.

Thomas is the one person who truly cared about Vinny and wanted answers more than anyone. It’ll be hard for Thomas to hear that Liam and Bill have been hiding such a massive secret all this time.

They robbed Thomas as well as Vinny’s girlfriend and family of closure for far too long.

However, Thomas will eventually settle down and try to look at the situation a bit more rationally. Despite Thomas’ issues with Hope’s hubby, he respects Liam as a good dad.

Thomas has been viewing the hit-and-run driver as a monster, but he’ll have to accept that’s not what Liam is at his core.

This will cause something to gnaw at Thomas deep down. Thomas will just feel like something isn’t exactly right here – like there could be other sinister forces at work that might’ve wanted Vinny dead.

It may be nothing more than an inkling at first, but Thomas will intend to pursue any lead he can find in the coming weeks. This is setting up the actual murder mystery, which will bring the truth about who really killed Vinny sooner or later.

In the meantime, Hope will be busy trying to get Liam released – even if it’s just out on bail for now. We’ll see Hope call on Justin Barber (Aaron D. Spears) for assistance, but she’ll also pay Liam a visit in lockup soon to offer support.

Hope will show Liam a drawing one of the kids made and try to lift his spirits with a promise that they’ll get through this.

As other B&B info comes in, we’ll deliver updates. The Bold and the Beautiful spoilers say some curveballs are in store for Liam as well as Bill, so don’t miss all the action! CDL will have other fantastic soap spoilers, updates and news posts to check out, so make us your hotspot.


Monday, June 14, 2021: Pass LD 194, our COVID-19 story, a just cause

Sen. Rick Bennett’s bill, LD 194, designed to prohibit businesses owned by foreign governments from lobbying, should pass without a second thought.

The reason is that, although Hydro-Quebec brought the Maine legal loophole to our attention, allowing foreign intervention by a foreign government in a Maine referendum places Mainers in a defensive position against a well-funded entity. While testimony on the bill centered on the issue of the current New England Clean Energy Connect powerline, the issue is much bigger and I thank Quebec for bringing it to our attention.

Not passing this bill sets precedent for any country in a similar position to lobby for their cause. Please note that this bill only affects businesses owned by a government and does not affect so many of the good investments private businesses headquartered in other countries have made in Maine.

In review of the current world situation, are there countries that people would not like to see using this same loophole? Yes, there is a laundry list of them — and by not fixing this loophole now, we will be giving them all a green light to abuse the referendum process.

Unintended consequences need review in many lights. Imagine the thoughts of the veterans that we honored over Memorial Day weekend if they knew that the Maine Legislature openly supported foreign governments competing with Mainers for the direction of Maine issues. People should contact their legislators today and let them know they respect our democratic process and the price our veterans have paid for it.

Our COVID-19 story

Regarding COVID-19: My family can personally attest to the fact that the vaccinations are good but do not offer 100 percent protection. This is what we all were told, which makes sense. Please, everyone, don’t let your guard down by relaxing on the safety measures we all know are helping to slow down the spread of this virus.

Our family of three has been very careful throughout the pandemic. My husband and I got a Johnson & Johnson vaccination the first week of April, and our daughter received her first Moderna shot in mid May. Guess what? Two of us got COVID!

We initially were shocked, but we realize our symptoms and the duration of our illness so far have been greatly diminished. We have the vaccination to thank for that. Still, we had our share of sickness and were down for the count for a week and a half.

To all unvaccinated folks out there: I beg you, please don’t play with your health and that of others, please get vaccinated!

Janet Bouchard

A just cause

John M. Crisp’s June 8 column in the BDN “Time for a better national motto” raises the question of the source and intent of the American motto “In God we trust.” He says “it’s presumptuous to make such an assertion of trust on behalf of an entire nation.”

I think the motto might have originated in the final verse of our national anthem ” The Star-Spangled Banner,” written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key as the War of 1812 neared its end. Probably most Americans are unaware that the anthem has four verses, as only the first is sung publicly. Here is the fourth and last verse:

“O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand between their loved homes and the war’s desolation. Blessed with victory and peace, may the heaven-rescued land praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, and this be our motto: In God is our trust. And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave o’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

Key was thanking God for rescuing and preserving the United States in two wars with Great Britain. But he seems to imply that to have confidence that we will prevail with divine aid in an armed conflict, we must have a just cause.


Flag Day is Monday, June 14th – Do you know the history of the American flag

SEYMOUR – The public is invited to attend a Flag Day ceremony on Monday, June 14th at 11 a.m. on the patio of the Seymour Elks Lodge 462 (also Brewskies Downtown restaurant), at 117 East Second Street in Seymour.

This annual holiday and ceremony will celebrate the history and symbolism of the American flag.

Flag Day is a celebration of the American flag that occurs each year on the anniversary of the flag’s official adoption, June 14.

What we know fondly as the “Stars and Stripes” was adopted by the Continental Congress as the official American flag on June 14, 1777, in the midst of the Revolutionary War. Colonial troops fought under many different flags with various symbols—rattlesnakes, pine trees, and eagles—and slogans—”Don’t Tread on Me,” “Liberty or Death,” and “Conquer or Die,” to name a few.

The Declaration of Independence made the adoption of an American flag necessary. Previously, each colony or special interest had its own flag.

On the 14th of June, Congress made the following resolution: “The flag of the United States shall be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white, with a union of thirteen stars of white on a blue field …” Official announcement of the new flag was not made until Sept. 3, 1777.

Who Made the First American Flag?

The origins of the Stars and Stripes have become part of American folklore. Although many people believe that Betsy Ross designed and sewed the first flag, there is no true proof of this. However, records do indicate that she made ensigns and pennants for the Philadelphia navy during the war. Various towns in colonial America have claimed to be the birthplace of the Stars and Stripes.

Based on colonial folklore, it has also been stated that the American flag was first flown in battle during the Revolutionary War at the Battle of Cooch’s Bridge in 1777.

The first American flag was designed to represent the 13 original colonies with 13 white stars on a blue field and 13 alternating red and white stripes.

One of the first flag designs had the stars arranged in a circle, based on the idea that all colonies were equal.

In 1818, after a few design changes, the United States Congress decided to retain the flag’s original 13 stripes and add new stars to reflect each new state that entered the union.

Today, there are 50 stars, one for each state in the union, but the 13 stripes remain.

WHY IS THE AMERICAN FLAG RED, WHITE, AND BLUE?

The Continental Congress left no record as to why it chose these colors. However, in 1782, the Congress of the Articles of Confederation chose the colors for the Great Seal of the United States with these meanings:

  • white for purity and innocence
  • red for valor and hardiness
  • blue for vigilance, perseverance, and justice

According to the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, the colors originated with the British flag, which is called the Union Jack and was a combination of the Scottish cross of St. Andrew (white on blue) and the English cross of St. George (red on white) at the time. (The modern British flag also incorporates the Irish cross of St. Patrick into its design.)

AMERICAN FLAG ETIQUETTE

Did you know that there is a proper way to fly the American flag? The U.S. Flag Code is an official set of guidelines (not laws) that dictates how a flag should be flown in order to show it the respect and honor that it deserves. Learn all about American Flag Etiquette here and be well prepared to hoist the flag this Flag Day!

WHERE MAY THE AMERICAN FLAG BE FLOWN 24 HOURS A DAY?

The flag is usually taken indoors at night out of respect, but there are some places where flying the flag around the clock is permissible. Do you think you can guess them?

  1. The Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia
  2. The White House
  3. The U.S. Capitol
  4. The Iwo Jima Memorial to U.S. Marines in Arlington, Virginia
  5. The Revolutionary War battleground in Lexington, Massachusetts
  6. The site of George Washington’s winter encampment at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
  7. Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland
  8. The Jenny Wade House in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (Jenny Wade was the only civilian killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, during the Civil War)
  9. The USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor
  10. All customs points of entry into the United States
  11. Any US Navy ship that is under way

In truth, the flag may be flown at night anywhere that it may be flown during the day, provided that it is properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.

Flag Day, celebrated annually on June 14, is not an official federal holiday, but its observance is traditionally proclaimed each year by the president of the United States.


MONDAY, June 9 - History

THE HISTORY(R) CHANNEL'S HIT SURVIVAL SERIES "ALONE" RETURNS FOR SEASON EIGHT ON THURSDAY JUNE 3 AT 9:30PM ET/PT

New Location Puts Contestants in One of the Densest Grizzly Bear Populations on Earth - Chilko Lake, British Columbia

New York, NY - May 6, 2021 - The HISTORY(R) Channel's popular nonfiction survival series "Alone" returns for season eight on Thursday, June 3 at 9:30PM ET/PT. This season, ten contestants fight to survive in the Canadian wilderness on the shores of Chilko Lake, British Columbia - a location with one of the densest grizzly bear populations on earth. Survivalists are dropped off in undisclosed, remote locations and equipped with just ten survival tools, and enough camera gear to self-document their experiences. The survivalist who endures the longest, facing total isolation, punishing weather, and deadly predators, will win the $500,000 grand prize. No camera crews. No gimmicks. "Alone" is the ultimate test of human will.

"'Alone' has always been a hit series for The HISTORY Channel, but this past year it has particularly resonated with audiences now-more-than-ever as we've watched survivalists endure total isolation through their ingenuity and mental willpower," said Eli Lehrer, Executive Vice President and Head of Programming for The HISTORY Channel. "This new season will continue to authentically feature the grit of human endurance and challenge viewers to look at the outdoors - and their own backyards - a bit differently."

Season eight of "Alone" sets the stakes higher than ever before in the most dangerous location yet. Survivalists must build their own shelters, forage their own food, and overcome numerous obstacles and dangerous predators in hopes of being the last person standing. Never before have contestants come into such frequent contact with the fierce and territorial grizzly bear, until now.

"Alone" is produced for The HISTORY(R) Channel by Leftfield Pictures (an ITV America company). Shawn Witt, Gretchen Palek, Ryan Pender and Dan Bree serve as executive producers for Leftfield Pictures. Zachary Behr serves as executive producer for The HISTORY(R) Channel.

A+E Networks holds worldwide distribution rights for both the series and the format for "Alone."


Watch the video: Today in History for June 9th (August 2022).