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Bert Hardy

Bert Hardy



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Bert Hardy was born in London in 1913. He started work as a laboratory assistant in a photographic agency. After buying a small plate camera for 10 shillings he began getting his photographs published.

In 1938 Hardy became one of the first photographers to use a Leica 35mm camera. After working as a freelance until being recruited by Tom Hopkinson, the editor of Picture Post. Hardy became famous for his photographs of the Blitz and in 1942 was drafted into an army photographic unit.

Hardy narrowly missed being sent to cover the Dieppe Raid (the photographer who did go was killed). Hardy was with Allied troops that took part in the D-Day landings in June 1944. Hardy, receiving the pay of an army sergeant, also photographed the liberation of Paris on 25th August. He followed the troops into Germany and in one picture recorded General Miles Dempsey crossing the Rhine. He also took photographs of concentration camp victims.

Hardy returned to Picture Post and covered the Korean War and Vietnam War for the magazine. After the magazine closed in 1957 Hardy worked in advertising until his retirement ten years later. Bert Hardy died in 1995.

To my great excitement, we found a remarkable new photographer. Bert Hardy was a young Cockney, the eldest of seven children, who had left school at fourteen. He left on a Friday afternoon and started work on Saturday morning in a printing and developing works at ten shillings a week with sixpence an hour overtime.

When Bert Hardy came in to see me he was in his twenties and already an experienced cameraman. To try him out I offered him a difficult assignment. The Blitz had started and I asked him to take pictures inside street shelters. No flash must be used and the pictures must make the reader feel he was inside with the shelterers in semi-darkness while bombs were falling. Bert passed the test triumphantly; I at once took him on the staff and he was soon a mainstay of the magazine.

I feel now that I must always have cut a rather futile figure as a war-correspondent, however often I was obliged to pose as one. For one thing I was almost continually afraid. Not particularly, I think, of getting killed, which seemed to be happening to most people, but of getting maimed and invalidated and left hanging around with legs or eyes and balls shot off; I never in the least fancied that. On the Korean assignment, as on many others, I was fortunately reinforced by my old mate and colleague Bert Hardy, and one of the good things about that was that Bert was no more of a John Wayne type than I. One of the daunting things in those days was to be attached to a cameraman with heroic instincts, who would follow the sound of the cannon as I follow the sound of the clinking glass, and who would shame one into dramatic gestures of great unwisdom.

Bert was, I am sure, as alarmed as I was, but there was one signal difference in our roles: he had to take the pictures, and it was long ago established that one way you cannot take pictures is lying face-down in a hole. I spent considerable periods of time doing that. Bert, on the other hand, was plying his trade upright in the open, cursing the military exigencies that had organized this invasion in the middle of the night. One of my enduring memories of that strange occasion is of Bert Hardy on the seawall of Blue Beach, blaspheming among the impossible din, and timing his exposures to the momentary flash of the rockets. That is the difference between the reporter's trade and the cameraman's. His art can never be emotion recalled in tranquillity. Ours can - or could be: the emotion is easy; the tranquillity more elusive.

During their time in Korea Hardy and Cameron made three picture stories, the most dramatic of these being the record of General MacArthur's landing at Inchon, the port of Seoul. Seoul was not only the capital of Korea but the key centre of communications for the invading armies - North Koreans backed by Chinese - now operating far down to the south after driving the South Koreans and their allies into what Cameron called "the toehold enclave of Pusan". The Inchon landing effectively cut the legs from under the attackers, dramatically reversing the whole military situation. This was the second most powerful seaborne invasion ever launched - only that against Normandy five years earlier having been bigger - and our two men were the only British photo-journalists present.

The Inchon landing was not the only story our two men had sent back, and one of the others posed a problem. Text and photographs showed vividly how the South Koreans, with at least the connivance of their American allies, were treating their political prisoners, suspected opponents of the tyrant Synghman Rhee. Rhee himself would in due course be ditched as the insupportable head of an intolerable regime by the American protectors who had kept him in power for so long; but that was still ten years on into the future, and in the meantime Rhee and his henchmen were our gallant allies and the upholders of our Christian democratic way of life. By the 1980s we have all seen treatment of prisoners more openly murderous than that revealed in Hardy's pictures, and Cameron's accompanying article would today be accounted mild. But in the climate of that time, with British and Australian troops involved in the fighting, any criticism of South Koreans was certain to be regarded as criticism of 'our' side. Such criticism, moreover, being anti-Western, must inevitably be 'pro-Eastern', and hence - with only a small distortion of language - 'Communist propaganda', a crime of which I was already being accused by my employer.


Meeting and Photographing Picture Post's Bert Hardy

Among my 81 books so far and numerous essays on many subjects I've authored about a half dozen books about Picture Post and Bert Hardy, that magazine's lead-photographer.

My meeting and photographing Bert Hardy in November 1981, around the time of my 31st birthday (just two years after I'd taken up photography decently), was so influential to my future works, that I didn't just write one story and forget about that meeting, but I wrote extensively about it. Eventually, an archival print of my best photo-portrait of Bert Hardy and his dogs Lizzie and Kim, was even added to the Photographs Collection of the British National Portrait Gallery, where it resides today.

I'd been a member of the Missouri-London Reporting Program that semester (Autumn 1981), with John H. Whale and Ernest Morgan our program moderators (JHW was our London instructor and editor). Mr. Whale's day job was working for the Sunday Times of London in many editorial capacities, and our group's office was on the top floor of the Sunday Times building at 200 Grays Inn Road. Mr. Whale's office was on a lower floor of that same building.

Sally Soames, an ST photojournalist, learned I was at least as interested in photography as I was in my semester's writing projects, and gave me the address of a black-and-white photo-printer she said was the best in the world, Grove Hardy Ltd. I went about my semester using a neighborhood printer instead, Prem Olsen. I covered many subjects with my writings, including 50 IRA relatives' meeting with the Cardinal of England Basil Hume at Westminster Catholic Cathedral, with one woman telling the Cardinal what he could do with his read-statement as she stormed out.

Covering 7 or 8 stories, I was still 4 or 5 stories short of my requirement (12, which I'd not reach then, thus my poor grades that semester). Near end of semester, Prem suggested I contact a photojournalist who'd taken good photos and who had good stories to tell about those photos. I obtained his phone number and arranged an interview. The photojournalist's name was Hardy, as it turned out the Hardy in Grove Hardy, so I talked with Sally again, and she said "Mr. Hardy is a very nice man."

I was instructed by the Hardys to take the train from the Elephant & Castle Station to Oxted in Surrey. The Elephant & Castle District was Bert's birth district, where he'd grown up in neo-Dickensian fashion in the 19-and-teens, in a rough and tumble world.

It took 38 minutes to arrive at Oxted by that train, and Bert was waiting for me to drive me to his 300-year-old farmstead, where Mrs. Hardy met us at the gate. The first interview was intriguing, with mentions of many famous people Bert had photographed, but also discussion of his photographing everyday places and people too, including his beloved Elephant & Castle, the street urchins of Glasgow, Betty Burden (the post-war Birmingham shop-girl in "Millions Like Her"), World War II, the Korean War and the Family of Man.

We also discussed the Queen's wedding of 1947, where Bert took some fairly good photos too, though he was at least as interested in telling me about how the all-day-position-locked-in photographers relieved themselves during the coverage (into thermos bottles). He also mentioned his advertising work, because after Picture Post closed in 1957, Bert opened his own advertising photo business, and was very successful with that too for a few years, before he got the bug to farm, and bought one with his second wife, Sheila.

When I mentioned I'd like to photograph Bert, I was told we'd need to schedule another meeting a couple of days' later, which we did, and I was driven back to Oxted for the train.

When I returned for those photos, I photographed not only Bert and his dogs, but Bert seated by his living room window, as well as Mrs. Hardy, plus a man from the Rank Company, who stopped in for a minute to say hello. However, the woman I married in 1986 (later divorced), absconded with many of my negatives from that 1981 shoot in 1987, though I'd first sent a few small prints to the Hardys.

Before I left my second interview with the Hardys, I was told I must also interview a mystery man of sorts, Mr. Hardy's Korean War writing partner, James Cameron. I did several days' later, but was not allowed to take his picture. However, James Cameron put Bert's Korean War photography into better context, especially regarding their coverages at Pusan (where the UN side was apparently executing political prisoners) and Inchon (the key turning point for the South Korean/UN side in that war Hardy and Cameron's coverage at Inchon was the only significant word-photo coverage of the first day's attack, and won the Missouri Pictures of the Year Award).

James suggested to me what he'd write about elsewhere, regarding how a photojournalist must stick his or her neck out to get their photos, while a writer can stay in back, then head home to his/her typewriter to compose his or her story more safely.

I've written in great detail and been published so many times about Bert's (and James's) coverages, including in my booklet "Crucial Collaborations", my dual biography of those two great journalists in my complete history of Picture Post, "All the Best" and in my biography of Bert Hardy, "The Cockney Eye", that readers interested in further specifics of the lives of Bert Hardy and James Cameron as chronicled by me, will either have to wait for more installments here, or search paper libraries and websites for what I've already published on those topics. Of course, many other writers have authored accounts of their lives too (including Bert and James themselves), but I've long felt a decent ability to cover their lives, due to meeting them in 1981 in their homes, as I did.

Regarding Bert's "weaknesses", I need to add that Bert loved the ladies, and saw quite a few of them on his many travels, which likely had something to do with the breakup of his marriage to Dora, his two sons' mom. Also, since he often had to do several photo-essays each week for Picture Post, he set up a lot of his photos. His photographic and human dexterity though, made nearly all his photos look very naturally arrived at, part of his true genius given the magazine's work conditions.

One other item: The first 18 BH photos I expressed interest in receiving prints of to illustrate my future writings about our interviews, were printed by Grove Hardy I received them a few days' after my interviews with Bert. In subsequent years, I've received additional prints of Bert's photos, and also many of my own photos over the years were printed by his darkroom too. I believe the Bert Hardy Darkroom (as it was later named) went out of business circa 2009, and Charlie Keeble, it's final manager, passed away a couple years ago. Mr. Hardy had passed in 1995, and many memorials still exist today to his name and works. (Sheila Hardy and Charlie Keeble were also old Picture Post hands, who learned picture research and darkroom skills on that great picture magazine, published from 1938 to 1957.)


Early Christian and Medieval Roots of Trick-or-Treating

An early 20th-century postcard of children on Halloween.

Rykoff Collection/Corbis/Getty Images

By the ninth century, Christianity had spread into Celtic lands, where it gradually blended with and supplanted older pagan rites. In 1000 A.D. the church designated November 2 as All Souls’ Day, a time for honoring the dead. Celebrations in England resembled Celtic commemorations of Samhain, complete with bonfires and masquerades. 

Poor people would visit the houses of wealthier families and receive pastries called soul cakes in exchange for a promise to pray for the souls of the homeowners’ dead relatives. Known as "souling," the practice was later taken up by children, who would go from door to door asking for gifts such as food, money and ale.

In Scotland and Ireland, young people took part in a tradition called guising, dressing up in costume and accepting offerings from various households. Rather than pledging to pray for the dead, they would sing a song, recite a poem, tell a joke or perform another sort of “trick” before collecting their treat, which typically consisted of fruit, nuts or coins.


You've Never Seen These Rare Photos of Audrey Hepburn Before

She's one of the most recognizable movie stars of all time, but even before Audrey Hepburn had her big break, the actress proved her undeniable charm on camera.

In the spring of 1950, the Belgian-born Brit modeled for Picture Post,a prominent UK photo magazine, while she was working as a chorus girl in London's West End. Photographer Bert Hardy brought the aspiring actress to the city's famous Kew Gardens and Richmond Park for a feature called "We Take a Girl to Look for Spring," and the rarely-seen portrait series definitely showcases her star quality.

Three years later, Hepburn's leading role in Roman Holiday would catapult her to fame, and the rest is history. But this special look at her early days definitely proves why Hollywood fell in love.


Tibetan Sovereignty Has a Long, Disputed History

Amid the invasion of Tibet in 1951 by the Chinese, a Tibetan mother and child walk the road between Tibet and Kalimpong, in the Indian state of West Bengal. Bert Hardy/Picture Post/Getty Images hide caption

Protesters this week have dogged the Olympic torch on its way to Beijing for the 2008 summer games. Over and over, they shout, "China out of Tibet! China out of Tibet!"

Many Tibetans believe China stole their independence more than 50 years ago, when the communist government staked what it calls a rightful and sacred claim on the tiny mountain nation.

As the protests continue, the Dalai Lama — Tibet's spiritual leader, arrives in Seattle on Friday for a conference on compassion. The Dalai Lama lives in exile in India. He says he does want more autonomy for his homeland but insists he's not seeking full independence from the Chinese government. Chinese officials accuse him of encouraging recent demonstrations against Chinese rule in Tibet — the largest and the most sustained in almost two decades.

The conflict has deep roots, says Robert Barnett, director of the modern Tibetan studies program at Columbia University and author of Lhasa: Streets with Memories.

China and Tibet tell the story differently. Chinese leaders used to say their claim on Tibet dates back a thousand years. More recently, reports Barnett, the date it to the 13th century. Tibetans disagree. "Tibetans . say there were relations between the two, quite close relations, but that Tibet never lost its independence," he says.

Tibet has never been considered independent by major players on the world stage, Barnett says. Tibet did declare itself independent in 1913, along with Mongolia. Back then, China was in the middle of a civil war. It then fought off invasions by Japan. The question of Tibet went on the backburner. "The Chinese say they were just busy," he says. "They were unable to deal with that and they don't accept it legally."

Barnett reaches back to 1903 for a key moment in the Tibetan saga. That's when the British forces crossed into Tibet, killing about 4,000 people in the process. "It was really a shameful episode," he says. "The British had no reason to invade Tibet. . They suddenly made Beijing worried about its back door." Worried that Britain would start carving up its territory, in 1910 the Manchu Dynasty decided to invade Tibet and call it a province.

Before then, Tibet has been a protectorate, with a Chinese governor. The Manchu Dynasty collapsed, and Tibetan soldiers drove the Chinese out. Barnett says China "never forgot that bloody wound." That's why the Chinese began making such a direct claim on Tibet.

As the Chinese empire was replaced by a modern state, Chinese nationalism became a cultural force. "The Communist party came to power in China by saying we had been humiliated for 150 years by the western powers in China and we're never going to let that happen again," Barnett says. "The Tibet issue directly challenges that kind of basic notion of what it is to be Chinese."

In 1951, Barnett relates, China "forced" Tibet to sign an agreement recognizing that Tibet is part of China. The Dalai Lama has lived in exile since. Now Tibetan activists and their allies are calling for China to leave Tibet entirely — even as the Dalai Lama maintains he's not seeking full sovereignty for his native land.

Barnett says the Dalai Lama is seeking a relationship with China that would give Beijing control in the arenas of defense and foreign affairs. The professor describes those terms as in keeping with the 1951 agreement. "But, of course, China now won't allow any vagueness," he says. "That's really what's happened."


Videographic Criticism

Audio-visual film criticism in the form of digital videographic essays has developed rapidly over the past two decades. As Michael Witt has noted,

The approach developed from, and retains close links with, the practices of the essay film, which has been identified from the mid-twentieth century onwards as a form of self-reflective film that embraces both documentary and experimental or poetic methods. 10 Timothy Corrigan has identified the deep links between literary essays and essay films, which he characterises in part as follows:

The expansive tradition of the essay film embraces works since the 1920s by Dziga Vertov, Jean-Luc Godard, Humphrey Jennings, Alain Resnais, Agnès Varda, Trinh T. Minh-ha, and many others. 12 In common with the practitioners of the videographic essay, many of these film-makers have developed essay films as highly personal responses to or dialogues with sequences of moving images, as notably Godard has done with his series Histoire(s) du cinéma (1988&ndash1998) and Chris Marker in Sans Soleil (1983), which begins with a voice-over reflection about a home movie shot of three children on a road in Iceland. Nearly all of the significant videographic essays have similarly employed and engaged with moving image sequences: films on film and time-based work on time-based objects. Thus, it has been possible for Christian Keathley to comment: &ldquothe full range of digital video technologies enables film scholars to write using the very materials that constitute their object of study: moving images and sounds.&rdquo 13

Such synergy is not the case, however, with moving images about still photography. Here, the two media might be said to compromise as much as to complement each other. Compared to the significant body of videographic work on film, it is relatively undeveloped on photography and other still images and many of the challenges that we have faced during this project have been in terms of the relationship between the film tool and the photographic object. Of course experimental film-makers, notably Marker and Varda again, have worked with and continue to work with the creative tensions between still and moving images, but nevertheless much of the best current analytical work has been engaged with film. 14 We see our focus on and concern with photography as one of the main contributions of our work to current debates on audio-visual criticism.

There is an extensive literature on the many and varied connections between the moving images of the cinema and the still images of photography. Reflecting on the centrality of photographs within numerous mainstream and experimental films, David Campany writes:

Yet, despite this rich legacy, including the highly distinctive use of photographs in films such as Chris Marker&rsquos La Jetée (1962), Godard&rsquos Les Carabiniers (1963) and his collaboration with Jean-Pierre Gorin, Letter to Jane: An Investigation about a Still (1972), and Hollis Frampton&rsquos (nostalgia) (1972), as well as more mainstream features such as Michelangelo Antonioni&rsquos Blow-Up (1966) and Christopher Nolan&rsquos Memento (2000), the presentation of still images in documentaries about individual photographers and &ldquothe art of&rdquo photography has rarely been more than illustrative. In Peter West&rsquos 1987 Third Eye/Channel 4 documentary Bert Hardy&rsquos World: A Portrait, for example, the photographer&rsquos images are featured on screen throughout, shown sometimes by respecting their original framing and sometimes as details, and both without movement and within a moving frame. They are integrated into and used to illustrate a narrative about subjects in immigrant communities in Britain in the 1940s, who were photographed by Hardy, and about those people and their descendants at the time the documentary was made. The &ldquodocumentary&rdquo nature of the images is unquestioned, as is the direct, largely unmediated, access they are assumed to give to a historical moment. Nor are either the aesthetic or the material qualities of the photographs engaged with they are images without size, texture, or tone integrated into and sustaining an anecdotal history. And in using photographs in a primarily illustrative manner, Bert Hardy&rsquos World is typical of the dominant presentation of still images in mainstream documentaries about photography.

Our exercises set out to question the presentation conventions of photographs in documentary films, and to work towards alternatives that employ and interrogate such images in new ways, highlighting their materialities and recognising their circulation on contact sheets and within the layouts of Picture Post. Our own handling of the contact sheets, of prints, and of archival copies of the magazine, and the specific tasks&mdashundertaken in close collaboration with the film-maker Todd MacDonald&mdashof filming these elements, and subsequently editing and post-producing the recordings, have also led us to new understandings about the ways in which photographs are and might be shown in moving image sequences. One central aspect of this is that we have come to understand that many of the conventional orthodoxies about film as the time-based medium and photography as the art of the frozen &ldquosignificant moment&rdquo do not stand up to the close analysis of the audio-visual form. Film allows the spectator to explore the temporalities of the photograph, the shadows and lights, the character and narrative traces that give it a temporality and, most especially, when it is part of a photo-sequence or news story. 16 These ideas are explored in more detail below in the detailed discussions of the two exercises, but one question that we returned to frequently throughout the production was what the appropriate or &ldquoright&rdquo duration was to hold a photograph on screen. How did our understandings of an image change throughout the duration of a single shot? What elements of an image might an extended duration reveal&mdashor obscure? How long could an image be held on screen, and how might a spectator&rsquos response change throughout an extended period? How, then, were the temporalities of the photograph shaped by the temporality of the moving image&mdashand what were the differences between the camera being immobile versus when it is moving across an image? Such questions are rarely foregrounded in documentary production, although implicit answers are contributed by the skills and experience of editors and directors, who make decisions intuitively on the basis of what &ldquofeels right&rdquo. In the production of the exercises, we were interested in surfacing such questions, at least implicitly, and in considering what new knowledge might be revealed by sequences that might, in conventional terms, &ldquofeel wrong&rdquo.


Veteran newspaper executive Bert Hardy dies

The veteran newspaper executive Bert Hardy died today after a long illness and a career in Fleet Street spanning six decades.

Hardy, who started in the newspaper business as a 14-year-old copy boy at Picture Post in 1942, was 80.

During a career spanning more than 60 years, Hardy was chief executive at a variety of newspaper groups including News International, the Evening Standard, Associated Newspapers and the European.

As recently as 2005 Hardy was made managing director of the London Evening Standard, following Mike Anderson's move to News International. Interviewed by MediaGuardian at the time, Hardy said: "I've enjoyed every minute. There hasn't been a day that I've not wanted to go to work. They've been great days, all of them." He had been diagnosed with a brain tumour six years previously.

Hardy has worked alongside some of the most famous names in newspapers, including Hugh Cudlipp, Rupert Murdoch, Vere Rothermere and the Barclay brothers and played a central role in some of the biggest moments in 20th-century press history, including the launch of the Sun, the end of Robert Maxwell's London paper dream and the Wapping revolution.

After serving in the army he rose to become ad manager at Mirror Group in Manchester, before becoming ad director at the Daily Herald and then the News of the World and the Sun.

Murdoch then tempted him to become chief executive at NI. As part of his stint working for Murdoch, Hardy bought the land at Wapping that was to be used to change the face of British newspapers and the relationship between editors and printers.

After 20 years with Murdoch he joined Associated where, among other things, he killed off Robert Maxwell's London Daily News by bringing back the Evening News. He returned after retirement to help in another London newspaper war, this time against Murdoch's the London Paper.

He was also deputy chairman of Channel 4 and Scotsman Publications.

Hardy, a keen horseracing fan, kept a box at Royal Ascot each year, notable for being a favoured venue for movers and shakers in the newspaper and advertising businesses.

Paul Dacre, the editor-in-chief of Associated Newspapers, led the tributes, saying: "Bert Hardy was the greatest newspaper manager of his generation, whose brilliance and foresight changed the course of our industry. His close involvement with the Wapping revolution changed Fleet Street and, indeed, no one fought harder to ensure our industry kept pace with the times.

"Bert, who didn't suffer fools gladly, was one hell of a tough negotiator but no one who knew him doubted his deep love of newspapers. His greatest love, however, was the Evening Standard."

Lord Rothermere, the chairman of Daily Mail & General Trust, said: "Bert Hardy was a phenomenally talented newspaper executive. He played a central role in many of its most momentous developments during his long and successful career.

"He was a key figure in the modern-day success of Associated Newspapers and I shall always remember him warmly for his love of and dedication to the Evening Standard."

Kevin Beatty, the chief executive of DMGT division A&N Media, said Hardy was a Fleet Street legend.

Beatty said: "Bert was a legend in our business and I, among many others, shall be forever indebted to him for the advice and guidance he so graciously gave me."

Murdoch MacLennan, the chief executive of Telegraph Media Group, said: "If anybody typified the term 'big beast' in the media industry it was Bert Hardy. Bert had a pivotal role in the building of Wapping and the creation of modern newspapers as well as contributing to the early success and growth of the Sun and News of the World. His work at Associated Newspapers, particularly with the Evening Standard, was outstanding. I shall remember him for his forensic ability to distinguish the facts from hype and spin. He was the newspaperman's newspaperman and a good friend."

To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email [email protected] or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000.

If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".


Looking at Picture Post

Collaboration on this project has been painstaking and we both acknowledge the time spent going down blind alleys and the lessons learned as we shifted from our own specialisms to a disciplinary and methodological give-and-take. The most straightforward stage was identifying our object of study. Although we began by discussing a project on Humphrey Jennings, we moved easily to Bert Hardy and Picture Post, driven, as it was, by our shared &ldquophotophilia&rdquo and care for these images. 17 Laura Mulvey has spoken most forcefully about the importance of &ldquocinephilia&rdquo, the love of cinema, for her &ldquodelayed cinema&rdquo work &ldquophotophilia&rdquo is a neologism, formulated to define that fascination with these images which has been one of the driving motivations of the project.

DOI Our discussions moved at an early stage to identifying which stories or images we should focus on. We began, as seemed appropriate, in the photographic archive. Edward Hulton, publisher and owner of Picture Post, understood the importance of picture and photo libraries and established the Hulton Picture Library in the late 1940s. The archive was purchased by the BBC in 1958, becoming part of the Radio Times photo library in 1996, the Hulton Picture Collection was acquired by Getty Images, who continue to own and preserve the Picture Post archive. 18 The history of this photo archive is relevant to our research working in the well-appointed rooms of Getty Images and looking at the rows of shelves and storage boxes, there is a palpable sense of the importance and richness of this collection&mdashof prints and negatives catalogued, filed, and awaiting recovery. As well as photographic negatives, contact sheets, and prints, all bearing the marks of successive editors and curators, Getty Images also has the Picture Post day book, which logs each story, the name of the photographer, and every roll of film and negatives that they submitted to the paper (Fig. 3). Our first stage of research was to identify and create a database of every story that Bert Hardy worked on, when it was published, or whether or not it was &ldquokilled&rdquo, as the day book puts it. With this comprehensive list of his work, we began to narrow down which stories we would focus on for the films.

We knew that one of the subjects we wanted to explore was the material qualities of the images created for and reproduced in Picture Post. In an age of digital newspaper media, it is difficult to comprehend how time-consuming, labour-intensive, and skilful the mechanical printing processes were and we recognised that the physicality of the technologies of making Picture Post was fundamental to the subsequent look of the printed photographs and pages. 19 The photogravure process used to reproduce the monochrome images in the pages of Picture Post is particularly good at producing rich effects from dark, contrasting subjects. The darker tones are made up of thicker layers of ink than the lighter tones the highlights are very sharp and the strongest darks are deep and well defined. Furthermore, in the hands of the highly skilled printers at Sun Printers Ltd, where Picture Post was published, the range of greyscale tones is incredibly varied and subtle. And these qualities can still be appreciated some eighty years later as one handles the thin, light pages of archival copies and scrutinises the individual images and their placing in narrativised sequences, on both light and dark grounds, with photographs bounded by frames or on occasions bled to the edges of pages. The integration of the text, headlines, and the captions can also be recognised as integral to the impact and meanings of the stories, and it is these and comparable aspects of the photographs that are lost when they are divorced from the page for presentation in a documentary or hung on a gallery wall as conventional art objects. In our exercises, we wanted to retain the &ldquothing-ness&rdquo of the magazine copies and the particular images that they carried and circulated.

Along with research in the archive of Getty Images, we also used the published memoirs of staff who worked on Picture Post in the 1940s and newsreel from the period. 20 In addition, there were a small number of television films about Picture Post, made when Hardy was alive and which are available through the BFI Viewing Service. 21 When the stories had been chosen, we also did extensive research on their historical contexts. To some degree, such work may have been more appropriate to a written study of Hardy&rsquos work nevertheless, this research informs and underpins the films and is part of their texture and tone. As we came to understand, however, there is a critical difference between the conceptualisation of a written essay and the &ldquomaterial thinking&rdquo of the videographic work. 22 The latter involves framing and thinking through research questions in visual and aural terms and through the methods of film rather than rhetoric. It is also an insistently practical process, implicated in and impossible to separate from the operations of digital cameras, editing software, and audio mixing systems, and&mdashat least for ourselves as neophytes at videographic production&mdashin collaboration with those experienced with such technologies. In addition to Todd MacDonald, who filmed and edited both exercises, we also worked on Life in the Elephant with the audio producer, Steve Lewinson.

We finally determined to work on two of Bert Hardy&rsquos Picture Post stories, both of which have a London setting. Born in 1913 in south London, Hardy was a Londoner in every sense of that early twentieth-century identification. He was a cockney his colleague at Picture Post, Anne Scott-James, described him as having the: &ldquoready wit and powers of improvisation of Sam Weller.&rdquo 23 He was companionable and chatty, a persona that he took advantage of throughout his working life. He started his photographic career at the age of fourteen, collecting and delivering photographic films for the Central Photographic Service, with a more lucrative sideline in &ldquonaughty pictures&rdquo. He began taking his own photographs, focusing at first on cycling clubs, which he sent to a magazine called The Bicycle, and bought a second-hand Leica, the camera that is now synonymous with twentieth-century photojournalism. Hardy was always directly involved in the material processes of photography, experimenting with developers, playing with exposure times, and doctoring the standard Leica flash unit to meet the needs of his subjects.

By the 1930s, German photographers and editors were beginning to have a significant impact on the British illustrated press, an influence that would lead directly to the look and style of Picture Post. Its creator and first editor, Stefan Lorant, was a Hungarian Jew who came to England in the 1930s as a refugee from Hitler&rsquos Germany, where he had produced silent films and had been chief editor of the Münchner Illustrierte Presse. Lorant, who was joined by German photographers like Kurt Hutton and Felix Mann, brought with him the new layout and style of continental photojournalism that became a part of the look of Picture Post from the beginning. In 1940, fearing a German invasion, Lorant went to the USA and was replaced as editor by Tom Hopkinson, who remained in this role until 1950.

Stuart Hall has described the distinctive quality of Picture Post as a result of the combination of two &ldquodistinctive journalistic traditions&rdquo: a tradition of English documentary reportage and a revolutionary visual style that came from avant-garde groups on the Continent. 24 Certainly, Picture Post, with its simple, direct layouts and its emphasis on a varied use of horizontal and vertical images and bold captions, looked different from its rival British illustrated papers. Photographs dictated the appearance of the stories. Tradition has it that the format was based on the proportions of a Leica 35mm negative and staff working on the magazine claimed that: &ldquoIt reported the news through &hellip the eye of the camera &hellip the pictures mattered more than the words.&rdquo 25

The histories of Picture Post and Bert Hardy converge in 1940. 26 Hardy started working for Picture Post on a freelance basis he had left the Central Photographic Service and with a colleague set up Criterion Press, which he pulled out of after a financial disagreement. He spent the later war years with the Army Film and Photographic Unit and, at the end of the war, he returned to Picture Post as a staff photographer. Hardy worked on an enormous range of subjects for the paper, from serious studies of post-war deprivation, to the most frivolous of &ldquogirlie&rdquo topics. Some of his stories won photographic awards others are forgettable. In 1950, Hopkinson commissioned Hardy to accompany the journalist James Cameron on a story about the Korean War. They came back with a report on the treatment of North Korean political prisoners by South Korean forces Hopkinson planned to publish the story but was stopped by the proprietor, Edward Hulton. Hopkinson was sacked as editor and a number of his staff resigned in support. Hardy continued to work for Picture Post until, with falling circulation figures, the magazine ceased publication in 1957.

There are many histories embedded in these brief facts: histories of the war and of the politics of wartime and post-war Britain histories of the press and histories of the business and practice of photography. All of these combine in the photography of Bert Hardy they are part of its grain and atmosphere. The two stories that are the subjects of our films represent key moments in these narratives, in which the elements are at their most concentrated and pivotal. The first is &ldquoFire-Fighters!&rdquo, which was published on 1 February 1941. This was one of the most significant assignments in Hardy&rsquos Picture Post career and marked a turning point in his professional status as a photojournalist. Hardy was still involved in Criterion Press and was commissioned to do a story on the London Fire Brigade as it dealt with the Luftwaffe&rsquos heaviest period of night bombing. He returned with an astonishing range of images of the firemen working on warehouse blazes, some are almost abstract in parts, a compound of fire, water, silhouetted buildings, and figures and, as published on the pages of Picture Post, they reach a crescendo of growing threat and pictorial illegibility. For the first time, the paper departed from its habit of anonymity and acknowledged the name of their photographer:

The anonymous cameraman becomes the named wartime photographer/hero: &ldquoA. Hardy, one of our cameramen&rdquo.

The second story is &ldquoLife in the Elephant&rdquo, published 8 January 1949, a six-page photo-story of everyday life in the Elephant and Castle, a poor and then bomb-damaged neighbourhood of south London. It was the kind of humanist story at which the paper excelled while Hopkinson was editor. With words by the journalist Albert Lloyd, who, like Hardy, was born in this part of London and was very much a local boy, it evokes the people and places of the area in every area of shadow and highlight, in every face, street, and room. &ldquoLife in the Elephant&rdquo has an almost mythic status in the history of twentieth-century British photojournalism. It won Hardy his second Encyclopaedia Britannica Award and has, ever since, been used to illustrate social histories of post-war Britain.

These are our two stories we might have chosen others and made different films but, without question, they represent Hardy&rsquos photography and Picture Post at their most powerful and expressive. Hardy and Picture Post, photographs and printed pages it was this combination that we were most drawn to and interested in. For this reason, our originals, the objects that we filmed, are the photographs at their grainiest, as printed on the pages of the magazine. In both films, we also use the original contact sheets that were made from Hardy&rsquos rolls of film, traces of the genesis of the story, and Hardy&rsquos working process. We did not use subsequent prints of Hardy&rsquos photographs or digital images because our focus was on the look of the photographs and their consumption by readers of Picture Post. The mise en page, the design of the printed pages, and the layout of text and images frame Hardy&rsquos photographs and give them their sense of place and time.


Bert Hardy’s Liverpool

Enjoyed the Blog? Buy my Book!

5 Responses to “Bert Hardy’s Liverpool”

Great post Colin, I look forward to seeing the book. Hope it’s out for Christmas, I can think of a few people who’d like a copy. Your choice for the post shows some of the range of Hardy’s work, from the great expressions on the Catholic lady’s audience and the smoky atmospherics of the Chinese hostel. I think I might treat myself to a copy of the book!

Yes indeed. Very interesting pictures. There seems to have been a spate of Liverpool books recently, (I’ve bought five!) so I must now dig deep!

[…] of which cover Liverpool, especially from angles you might not previously have seen. Colin gives an overview of the new Bert Hardy book in the latest post on his […]

[…] published via his Bluecoat Press). ?On his highly-recommended blog, Streets of Liverpool, Colin writes that it is, ‘if I may be so bold, the best book I have ever done’. ?It certainly is: a […]

[…] of which cover Liverpool, especially from angles you might not previously have seen. Colin gives an overview of the new Bert Hardy book in the latest post on his […]


Bert Hardy Auction Price Results

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) LIVERPOOL, c.1950, vintage silver gelatin print, image size, 228 x 245mm, with photographer stamp, printed signature & customs stamp verso .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 284 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Oct 28, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) MAIDENS IN WAITING, BLACKPOOL, 1951, silver gelatin print, image size, 250mm x 340mm, sheet size, 300mm x 400mm, signed recto and with photographers blindstamp verso, with original picture post titles .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 285 : Bert Hardy (1913-1990)

Auction Date: Oct 28, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1990)COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LONDON, JANUARY, 8, 1946, silver gelatin print, printed pre 1957, image size, 240 x 305mm, signed in ink recto and with typed Picture Post label verso "There are thousands of similar basement rooms where tens of thousands of people live - yet each one is different" Hardy, My Life, Gordon Fraser, 1985, p. 108 .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 119 : Bert Hardy, British 1913-1995- - Boy scout walking large dog in the park, 1949

Auction Date: Jul 15, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy,
British 1913-1995-
Boy scout walking large dog in the park, 1949
gelatin silver print, signed lower right, 30.4 x 40.1cm (unframed)(ARR)

Provenance: The Photographer's Gallery, London, where purchased in the 1980s.
Please refer to department for condition report
Unframed
stuck down on card
slight tear in the margin top left corner
faint crease right hand corner
signed lower right corner in black ink. .

Location: West Norwood, LDN, UK

Auction House: Roseberys

Lot 286 : BERT HARDY (1913-1995) Photograph from Five Girls on a Yacht Shoot,

Auction Date: May 21, 2020

Description: BERT HARDY (1913-1995) Photograph from Five Girls on a Yacht Shoot, July 1955, five British models were taken on a cruise of the Cote dɺzur, sponsored by Picture Post to promote the latest London summer fashions, gelatin silver print, printed later, c.2000, image 27.5cm x 40cm .

Location: Thatcham, BRK, UK

Auction House: Flints Auctions Ltd

Lot 22 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Apr 29, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) WARTIME TERMINUS, PADDINGTON, 1942, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 33 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Apr 29, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) ON THE FRONT STEPS, ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LONDON 1948, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 102 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Apr 29, 2020

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 257mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 47 : Bert Hardy (1913-1990) Cockney Life at The Elephant and Castle, London

Auction Date: Dec 17, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1990)
Cockney Life at The Elephant and Castle, London, January 9, 1949
Gelatin silver print, printed later, signed in ink in the margin credit stamp on the verso.
8 7/8 x 14in (22.5 x 35.6cm)
sheet 12 x 16in (30.5 x 40.6cm)

For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website .

Location: New York, NY, US

Auction House: Bonhams

Lot 32 : Bert Hardy (1913-1990) Maidens in Waiting

Auction Date: Dec 17, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1990)
Maidens in Waiting, 1951
Gelatin silver print, printed later, signed in ink in the margin copyright credit stamp on the verso.
13 x 10in (33 x 25.5cm)
sheet 16 x 12in (40.5 x 30.6cm)

For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website .

Location: New York, NY, US

Auction House: Bonhams

Lot 56 : Bert Hardy (1913-1990) The Gorbals Boys, Glasgow

Auction Date: Dec 17, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1990)
The Gorbals Boys, Glasgow, 1948
Gelatin silver print, printed later, signed in ink in the margin copyright credit stamp on the verso.
9 1/2 x 14in (24.1 x 35.6cm)
sheet 12 x 16in (30.5 x 40.6cm)

For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website .

Location: New York, NY, US

Auction House: Bonhams

Lot 224 : Bert Hardy, .Four Picture Post signed photographic reproductions

Auction Date: Dec 02, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy, Four Picture Post photographic reproductions, printed mid-1980s, including: Gathering Firewood, Wapping, 1953, Piccadilly shoe-shiner, 1953, Barber's Shop, Liverpool, 1949, and Hop-pickers, 1951, each signed in black ink lower right margin, image sizes 40 x 27.5cm, sheet sizes 43.5 x 36cm, unframed. (Qty: 4) .

Location: Market Harborough, LEC, UK

Auction House: Gildings Auctioneers

Lot 180 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 14, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 257mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 192 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 14, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) ON THE FRONT STEPS, ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LONDON 1948, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 201 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 14, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) GIBRALTAR, THE COMBINED FLEETS ASHORE, 1954, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 237mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 205 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 14, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) WARTIME TERMINUS, PADDINGTON, 1942, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 210 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: Nov 14, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 GORBAL BOYS, 1948, silver gelatin print, image size., 350mm x 235mm, signed recto, window mounted and framed (512mmx414mm) In January 1948, the illustrated magazine, 'Picture Post', published an article about a working-class district of Glasgow which it described as 'The Forgotten Gorbals'. The article advocated urgent social reform and was accompanied by thirteen photographs, three by Bill Brandt and the rest by Bert Hardy. This image shows two young boys running to the local shop. It became one of Hardy’s most iconic works, capturing childhood optimism beyond the poverty and squalor that most families experienced whilst crammed into the area’s tenements. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 169 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: May 16, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 GORBAL BOYS, 1948, silver gelatin print, image size., 350mm x 235mm, paper size 400mm x 300mm, with substantial scuffs and scoring to upper margin of image, lacking signature or credit stamps anywhere on print surface or verso In January 1948, the illustrated magazine, 'Picture Post', published an article about a working-class district of Glasgow which it described as 'The Forgotten Gorbals'. The article advocated urgent social reform and was accompanied by thirteen photographs, three by Bill Brandt and the rest by Bert Hardy. This image shows two young boys running to the local shop. It became one of Hardy’s most iconic works, capturing childhood optimism beyond the poverty and squalor that most families experienced whilst crammed into the area’s tenements. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 168 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: May 16, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 FIREFIGHTERS, LONDON, 1941, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 255mm, signed recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery, London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 170 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: May 16, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, AT SALVATION ARMY HOSTEL, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 350mm x 239mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 172 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: May 16, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 STRAND CIGARETTES ADVERT, 1960, vintage silver gelatin prints (2), image sizes, 243mm x 160mm, 187mm x 190mm, titled and dated in unknown hand to the verso and with photographers credit stamp .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 171 : Bert Hardy 1913-1995

Auction Date: May 16, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy 1913-1995 COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LATE AT NIGHT, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 254mm, signed by the photographer in ink, recto, photographer's credit stamp verso, Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London ARR" .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 55 : BERT HARDY | Cockney Life at Elephant and Castle, 1949

Auction Date: Mar 20, 2019

Description: Silver print, printed later. Signed in black ink in the lower margin. Photographer's copyright stamp on the verso. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Sotheby's

Lot 200 : Bert Hardy (b.1913)

Auction Date: Jan 10, 2019

Description: Bert Hardy (b.1913) The Gorbals, a later print, signed in black felt tip pen to lower right margin, 24 x 35cm .

Location: Cambridge, CBE, UK

Auction House: Cheffins

Lot 528 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) PANDOGRAPHER, 1939,

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) PANDOGRAPHER, 1939, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 245mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso, Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 531 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) WARTIME TERMINUS, PADDINGTON, 1942, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 529 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) FIREFIGHTERS, LONDON, 1941

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) FIREFIGHTERS, LONDON, 1941, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 255mm, signed recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery, London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 530 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) WARTIME TERMINUS, PADDINGTO

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) WARTIME TERMINUS, PADDINGTON, 1942, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery, London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 532 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) MARY, THE GORBALS, 1948, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 250mm, signed recto, photographer's credit stamp verso and picture post magazine typed press title affixed Provenance: The Photographers Gallery, London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 534 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, LATE AT NIGHT, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 340mm x 254mm, signed by the photographer in ink, recto, photographer's credit stamp verso, Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 533 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) COCKNEY LIFE AT ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 350mm x 225mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 535 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) COCKNEY LIFE AT THE ELEPHANT AND CASTLE, AT SALVATION ARMY HOSTEL, 1949, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 350mm x 239mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso, Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 537 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) CHELSEA PARTY, 1952, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 352mm x 241mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso, Provenance: The Photographers Gallery, London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 536 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) HULL FISH DOCKS, 3rd 1951, The girls who gut the fish. They wrap their fingers in rags against the cold but wield their knives like professionals, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size, 350mm x 250mm, signed recto, with address stamp verso and picture post typed title affixed to verso of mount .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 538 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) PICADILLY CIRCUS #2, 1953, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size, 360mm x 240mm, signed recto, photographer's credit stamp and typed press title verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 540 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) BIRMINGHAM, THE BEST AND THE WORST, Picture Post, 6th February 1954 -They lived in cramped 𧮬k to back' houses with no garden. Homelife is strong but there is a lack of community, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 242mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, small portion of negative missing from the top right of print Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 539 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995)

Auction Date: Nov 28, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) GIBRALTAR, THE COMBINED FLEETS ASHORE, 1954, silver gelatin print, printed later, image size 355mm x 237mm, signed by the photographer in ink recto, photographer's credit stamp verso Provenance: The Photographers Gallery London .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Chiswick Auctions

Lot 32 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Gorbals Boys, Glasgow, 1948

Auction Date: Jun 01, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Gorbals Boys, Glasgow, 1948
Gelatin silver print, signed in black ink in the margin, with photographer's copyright stamp verso,
24 x 35cm (9 1/2 x 13 3/4in)

This lot is sold subject to Artists Resale Rights, details of which can be found in our Terms and Conditions. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Forum Auctions - UK

Lot 33 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Pandographer, 1939

Auction Date: Jun 01, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Pandographer, 1939
Gelatin silver print, printed 1995, signed and editioned 12/200 in pencil by Sheila Hardy with the photographer's copyright stamp verso,
17.8 x 25cm (7 x 9 7/8in)
Provenance: The Photographers' Gallery, London

This lot is sold subject to Artists Resale Rights, details of which can be found in our Terms and Conditions. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Forum Auctions - UK

Lot 83 : Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Francoise Sagan, 1955

Auction Date: Jun 01, 2018

Description: Bert Hardy (1913-1995) Francoise Sagan, 1955
Gelatin silver print, printed before 1966, with unidentified Belgian stamp (Schipol) verso, 36.5 x 27.2cm (14 3/8 x 10 5/8in)

This lot is sold subject to Artists Resale Rights, details of which can be found in our Terms and Conditions. .

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Forum Auctions - UK

Lot 53 : Bert Hardy, Wartime Terminus, Paddington Station, 1942

Auction Date: Dec 02, 2016

Description: Bert Hardy (1913 - 1995)
Wartime Terminus, Paddington Station, 1942
Gelatin silver print, printed later
Signed in ink on recto with photographer?s address stamp on verso
30 x 40 cm (12 x 16 in)
Private Collection, Europe

Condition Report:

This print is in very good condition.

Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

Auctionata charges the resale rights tax pursuant to Section 26 of the German Copyright Act (UrhG) towards the buyer in case of the sale of an original work of art or photography prior to 70 years having lapsed since the death of their creator. Therefore, Auctionata charges when purchasing a good ? if a protection as an original work of art or photography is given ? starting from a hammer price of EUR 400 an additional amount, which is calculated according to Section 26 (2) German Copyright Act (UrhG) and which does not exceed the amount of EUR 12,500. You can find more information about resale rights tax in Auctionata´s table of fees and T&C.

Location: London, LDN, UK

Auction House: Auctionata Paddle8 AG

Lot 54 : Bert Hardy, Cockney Life at the Elephant and Castle, (. ) 1949

Auction Date: Dec 02, 2016

Description: Bert Hardy (1913 - 1995)
Cockney Life at the Elephant and Castle, January 9th, 1949
Gelatin silver print, printed later
Signed in ink on recto with photographer?s address stamp on verso
30 x 40 cm (12 x 16 in)
Private Collection, Europe

Condition Report:

This print is in very good condition.

Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

Auctionata charges the resale rights tax pursuant to Section 26 of the German Copyright Act (UrhG) towards the buyer in case of the sale of an original work of art or photography prior to 70 years having lapsed since the death of their creator. Therefore, Auctionata charges when purchasing a good ? if a protection as an original work of art or photography is given ? starting from a hammer price of EUR 400 an additional amount, which is calculated according to Section 26 (2) German Copyright Act (UrhG) and which does not exceed the amount of EUR 12,500. You can find more information about resale rights tax in Auctionata´s table of fees and T&C.


Watch the video: Bert Hardy - A Very British Photographer (August 2022).