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Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.6

Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.6



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Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.6

The Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.6 was one of a series of early R.A.F. aircraft that were official produced by reconstructing damaged aircraft, in this case the Factory's own S.E.1. As with every other aircraft built using this cover story just about the only think it had in common with the S.E.1 was its 60hp ENV water-cooled engine. In every other way the B.E.6 was a standard early entry in the B.E.2 family, and was a two-bay tractor biplane with un-staggered wings. Even the engine didn't survive for long, and when the aircraft was handed over to the R.F.C., a few days after its maiden flight on 5 September 1912, it was powered by a 60hp Renault engine. The R.F.C. treated the B.E.6 as a standard B.E.2. After some time with No.2 and then No.4 Squadron it went to France with No.6 Squadron, where it saw active service. The aircraft eventually returned to Britain where it was used as a training aircraft, before disappearing from the record.


Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.6

Of similar construction to the F.E.3, the F.E.6 was built in 1914 and was powered by a 120hp Austro-Daimler six-cylinder water-cooled engine. Standard R.E.5 components were used for the wings, which were of equispan, and the tail unit was carried on a cantilever boom, without bracing wires. The F.E.6 was flown at Farnborough on 14 November 1914 but this may have been its only flight, and, if fitted, the COW gun that it was designed to carry was not fired.

I can confirm that the picture is of a Zepplin interceptor.
One of about 12 or so built by Bristol.

I suspect the picture is incorrect

That sure looks like the tractor type, RAF S.E.2 to me.

I thought that the F.E 2, F.E.8 & F.E.6 were all pushers?

gastank and a Lewis gun capable of firing upwards into Zeppelins. Used for Home Defense, 1916.

The photo appears to be the BE2C "Intercepter" with observer's cockpit filled with a gastank and a Lewis gun capable of firing upwards into Zeppelins. Used for Home Defense, 1916.


Aircraft similar to or like Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.4

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Experimental two-seat single-engined biplane from before World War I, intended to develop reconnaissance aircraft. The earliest systematic naming scheme used by the Royal Aircraft Factory categorised by layout, e.g. B.E.2, with B for Bleriot type or tractor aircraft plus E for experimental. Wikipedia

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The aircraftofRoyal Aircraft Factory

The B.E. designation at first indicated 'Bleriot Experimental', Louis Bleriot being credited with having originated the tractor-engined aeroplane. With the appearance .

Follow-up to the B.E.2 powered by a 60kW Gnome rotary engine. Small numbers served as reconnaissance and then training aircraft .

Located at Farnborough and engaged primarily in aeronautical research, the Royal Aircraft Factory (so named in April 1912) was responsible for the .

The S.E.2 was a rebuild of the unarmed B.S.1, which was designed at Farnborough by Geoffrey de Havilland assisted by H P .

Of similar construction to the F.E.3, the F.E.6 was built in 1914 and was powered by a 120hp Austro-Daimler six-cylinder water-cooled engine. .

Second of the Farnborough designs to bear a "Bleriot Experimental" designation as a general-purpose tractor biplane, the B.E.2 appeared in 1912 and .

Designed at Farnborough by H P Folland at the end of 1914, the S.E.4a was one of a series of "Scouting .

Sharing little more than its configuration with the F.E.2 flown at Farnborough in 1913, the F.E.2a appeared early in 1915 and was .

Evolved at Farnborough during 1915 as a marriage of the B.E.2c airframe with the then-new R.A.F.4 air-cooled 12-cylinder Vee-type engine of .

Designed under the direction of John Kenworthy, the F.E.8 was the first single-seat fighter evolved as such at Farnborough, where the first .

The R.E. designation indicated 'Reconnaissance Experimental' and the R.E.5, only 24 of which were built for the RFC, was operated successfully .

Known as the 'Harry Tate', the R.E.8 looked a little like a scaled-up B.E.2. During the course of the latter .

Second only to the Sopwith Camel in reputation as the RFC's outstanding fighter of World War I, the S.E.5 was designed under .

Used mainly by the RFC during 1916, the R.E.7 was a two-seat (later occasionally three-seat) bombing biplane powered by a .

First flown in February 1916 and destined to be built in larger numbers than the B.E.2c, the B.E.2e differed from the .

On 7 April 1916, a version of the F.E.2b was flown at the RAF Farnborough, fitted with a 250hp Rolls-Royce Mk .

With the B.E.12 established in production in 1916, based on the B.E.2c airframe with its equi-span two-bay wing and massive horizontal tail .

Among the 12 F.E.2a's sent to France in 1915, where they were flown by No 6 Squadron RFC and sometimes known by .

In an attempt to improve the performance of the B.E.12, primarily for the benefit of Home Defence squadrons, a 200hp Hispano-Suiza .

The third prototype of the S.E.5 flew at Farnborough on 12 January 1917 powered by a 200hp geared Hispano- Suiza 8B water-cooled .

Conceived as a replacement for the F.E.2b in the fighter-reconnaissance role, the F.E.9 was of similar pusher configuration and therefore already .

As a derivative of the F.E.9, the RAF planned to develop a dedicated night fighter as the F.E.12. This was to have .

The last aircraft type to emerge from the Royal Aircraft Factory at Farnborough, before its change of name in June 1918 to .


Tartalomjegyzék

Az első világháború kitörése után az 1914-ben Franciaországba érkező első brit harcigépek a B.E.2a-k voltak. Akárcsak az őket követő B.E.2b-k, ezek a gépek is fegyvertelen bombázógépek, egy 24 kg-os vagy három, ennél kisebb bombát lehetett ledobni róluk.

A stabilabb B.E.2c bevált felderítő- és bombázógépként, nagy hátránya volt azonban, hogy nagyon kevéssé volt fordulékony. A Zeppelin léghajók vadászatában ez nem gátolta ugyan, de 1915-től a nyugati arcvonalon megjelenő, mereven beépített, előretüzelő géppuskával felszerelt Fokker együléses vadászgépek súlyos veszteségeket okoztak a B.E.2c-kben.

Hátrányosnak bizonyult az is, hogy a típusváltozat egyetlen fegyverzete az elülső ülésbe szerelt, kézzel működtetett géppuska volt. Az 1916-ban megjelent változathoz képest helyet cserélt, a megfigyelő most már a hátsó ülésben ült, az első ülés elé még egy, a repülés irányába tüzelő, merev géppuskát építettek be. A B.E.2e-n azonban visszatértek a korábbi üléselrendezéshez.

A B.E.2-t Geoffrey de Havilland tervezte a B.E.1 fejlesztéseként 60 lóerős (45 kW) léghűtéses Renault V-8 motorral, leváltva ezzel a vízhűtéses Wolseley motort, melyet még a korábbi gépen alkalmaztak. Első felszállására 1912. február 1-jén került sor, a tesztpilóta maga de Havilland volt. 1912. augusztus 12-én brit magassági rekordot állított fel 3219 méteres repülési magasságával. Sorozatgyártása indulásakor felderítőgépként gyártották, két évvel később három századot szereltek fel vele. Ezeket a századokat teljes létszámukkal Franciaországba küldték röviddel a háború kitörése után. A korai B.E.2a és b gépeket az 1915-ös év folyamán B.E.2c gépekkel cserélték, amelyet jócskán módosítottak, így lényegében egy új típust képviselt, amely Edward Teshmaker Busk kutatásain alapult. 1916-ban a „c” típust a végleges változattal, a B.E.2e géppel váltották fel, amely a „Quirk” becenevet viselte.

1917-re az utolsó B.E.2e-t is kivonták a frontszolgálatból, viszont a gép már sokkal korábban elavultnak számított. A háború további részében honvédelmi vadászrepülőgépként és kiképzőgépként szolgált.

Nagyjából 3500 darab B.E.2 repülőgépet építettek 20 különféle gyárban, viszont pontos leírás nem készült a különböző gyárakban készült modellekről, habár minden valószínűség szerint a B.E.2c készülhetett a legnagyobb mennyiségben.

A B.E.2 nem volt egy közkedvelt típus és 1916-ra igen népszerűtlenné vált.

Mint katonai gép több komoly gyengeséggel küszködött. Az első a kicsi léghűtéses motorjából adódott, amely miatt a gép igen lassú és megbízhatatlan volt, még az akkori normák szerint is. Mikor bombákat szállítottak vagy mikor a gép maximális hatótávolságára volt szükség, a megfigyelőt és géppuskáját hátra kellett hagyni. Habár a B.E.2 teljesítménye 1914-15-ben elfogadható volt, még akkor is sokáig szolgálatban maradt, mikor az ellenségnek már sokkal erősebb gépei voltak.

A másik fő gyengesége a következő volt: mivel gyakran együléses gépként repülték, fontos volt, hogy a megfigyelő ülését a pilóta ülése elé helyezzék. Ebben a nem túl szerencsés helyzetben a megfigyelőt zavarták a felső szárny támasztékai és rögzítései, így gyakran a pilóta feje felett kellett visszalőnie az ellenséges gépekre.

A gép tényleges sebezhetősége 1915-ben bizonyosodott be, mikor megjelentek az első német vadászgépek. A repülőgép nem volt képes legyőzni még az igen primitívnek számító Fokker E.I vadászgépet sem, így gyakorlatilag teljesen haszontalan volt az 1916-17-ben megjelenő újabb német vadászgépekkel szemben.


Royal Aircraft Factory RE.8

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Use this image under fair dealing.

All Rights Reserved except for Fair Dealing exceptions otherwise permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

Accepted Non-commercial Use

Permitted use for these purposes:

If you are interested in the full range of licenses available for this material, please contact one of our collections sales and licensing teams.


Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5a

The third prototype of the S.E.5 flew at Farnborough on 12 January 1917 powered by a 200hp geared Hispano- Suiza 8B water-cooled eight-cylinder V-type engine, but otherwise similar to the 150hp-engined earlier prototypes. While production deliveries of the 200hp engine were awaited, airframe modifications were introduced in the light of early experience with the first production batch of S.E.5s. In particular, the wing rear spars were shortened at the tips to provide greater strength, this serving to blunt the previously raked tips and reduce overall span by 39.4cm. At the same time, lateral control was improved by shortening the levers on the ailerons. With a small Avro-type windscreen in place of the S.E.5's voluminous structure, a small fabric-covered head fairing behind the cockpit, the blunt wings and the standard Vickers + Lewis gun armament, the version with 200hp engine became the subject of large-scale production as the S.E.5a, starting with part of the second batch S.E.5s already ordered from the RAF. Two hundred more were built at Farnborough itself and, in addition, by the time the war came to an end in November 1918, some 5125 S.E.5a's had been built by five companies in less than 18 months: Austin (1,550), Bleriot & Spad (560), Martinsyde (400), Vickers (2,215) and Wolseley (400). Production of the 200hp Hispano (in several sub-variants, and including licence-production by Wolseley as the W.4B Adder I, II and III) failed to keep pace with this prodigious output, and numerous operational difficulties with the engine enhanced the problem. Consequently, many S.E.5a's were fitted (without change of designation) with the 200hp direct-drive Wolseley W.4A Viper, a derivative of the French engine. At least six S.E.5a's were flown with the 200hp Sunbeam Arab I (geared) or Arab II (direct drive) water-cooled eight-cylinder engine in trials at Farnborough, and some production aircraft received high-compression versions of the French-built Hispano-Suiza engine, increasing maximum" output to 220hp. Twenty-two squadrons of the RFC and the US Air Service were flying the S.E.5a by the time of the Armistice, but this brought an end to planned largescale production by Curtiss in the US when only one of 1,000 on order had been completed (in addition to 56 assembled from British components). Service use continued on a small scale for only a short time after the end of the war, in Australia, Canada and South Africa as well as with the RAF.

Try to get a Lanier RC ARF. The SE5-A and the Fokker D-7 are both great flyers, but have been unavailable for nearly 10 years. I was fortunate to find a Lanier SE5-A at a swap meet 5 years ago. Span about 40", weight 32 oz. I'm using a 1300mAh 3S pack on a 1100 kV motor and the prop is a 10x3.8" APC. A 25A ESC is installed and the airplane flys great with this setup.

Both aircraft are built of balsa /lite ply and have slightly undercambered airfoils.

Pat Tritle designed a great little SE5-A many years ago. His designs are EXTREMELY light! I think the short-kit can be obtained from Brodak.

I'm creating an E-10 Math drill-and-practice game and would like to use some of your three view drawings for aircraft as part of the game.

When I was Deputy Director Weapons at RAE in the early 1980's the Chief of Experimental Flying, Group Captain Reggie Spiers RAF, flew the only surviving SE5a still kept at Farnborough. It had a Wolseley engine and great care had to be taken with the setting of the radiator vents to keep the engine at the right temperature. In all other respects Spiers regarded it as a nice aircraft to fly.

Service use continued on a small scale for only a short time after the end of the war, in Australia, Canada and South Africa as well as with the RAF.

Thank you for the information and the 3 view drawings, I intend making a scale model of this great little biplane, electric powered and radio controlled about 36 inch (91.5cm) wing span.


Índice

Ele era claramente uma reconstrução do Voisin II impulsionado por um motor Wolseley refrigerado a água de 60 hp, o B.E.1 usava apenas o motor e o radiador daquele avião, sendo o radiador montado entre o par de "estruturas cabane" frontais. As asas tinhas envergaduras diferentes: a superior com cerca de 11 m e a inferior com cerca de 10,5 m. [ 4 ]

Seu primeiro voo ocorreu em 4 de dezembro de 1911 pilotado por de Havilland. [ 5 ] O avião não tornou a voar até 27 de Dezembro, quando foi modificado com a substituição do carburador original Wolseley por um Claudel, que permitia o controle de potência. Outras pequenas modificações foram efetuadas nas semanas seguintes: as rodas do trem de pouso foram movidas mais para trás 30,4 cm, as asas (que originalmente não estavam em diedro) foram reposicionadas e passaram a ter um ângulo de 1° em relação à horizontal, e a hélice foi reduzida no comprimento, tentando aumentar a velocidade do motor. [ 6 ] Mais tarde o motor Wolseley foi substituído por um Renault de 60 hp refrigerado à ar. [ 7 ]


• Royal Flying Corps •

Military aviation in Britain can be said to have commenced with the first flight of the military balloon 'Pioneer' on 23rd August 1878 by the Royal Engineers under the direction of Capt James Lethbridge Brooke Templer.

A Balloon Equipment Store was established at Woolwich at this time and a School of Ballooning shortly after. In 1882 the School and Factory moved to Chatham. Balloons were subsequently used during the Boer War in 1899.

Following the first powered flight in Britain by Samuel Franklin Cody on 16th October 1908 the Royal Engineers developed an interest in heavier-than-air machines, and on 1st April 1911 the Balloon Section became the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers comprising No.1 (Airship) Company and No.2 (Aeroplane) Company.

The Royal Flying Corps was established by Royal Warrant on the 13th April 1912. The Central Flying School was formed on the 12th May and the 3 initial squadrons a day later.

The main branches of the RFC were:

The Military Wing - comprising 2 aeroplane squadrons (No.2 and No.3) and one airship/balloon squadron (No.1)

The Central Flying School

The Royal Aircraft Factory

Prior to the outbreak of war a further 4 squadrons were formed. No.4 on 12th September 1912, No.5 (26th July 1913), No.6 (31st January 1914), and No.7 (1st May 1914).

On 1st July 1914 the Naval Wing took control of all airships and balloons, and became the Royal Naval Air Service under Admiralty control.

On the outbreak of war on 4th August 1914 the RFC had 147 officers, 1097 men and 179 aeroplanes.

The Royal Flying Corps ceased to exist with the amalgamation of the RFC and RNAS into the Royal Air Force on 1st April 1918.


Watch the video: Avioni Vojske Srbije iznad Jarinja. (August 2022).