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This Day in History: 06/25/1876 - Battle of Little Bighorn

This Day in History: 06/25/1876 - Battle of Little Bighorn



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This Day In History gives us some really interesting tidbits on what has happened in the past on the day of June 25th. Learn some cool things that you may not have known like how on this day CBS broadcasted a show in color for televisions. Journey back to the times with General Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn and learn that the only survivor was a horse.


Little Bighorn Battlefield’s Haunted Past: Paranormal Phenomenon Reported

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Image courtesy of the National Park Service.

The Sioux Nation’s Hunkpapa Lakota, Sans Arc, Oglala Lakota, Miniconjoux and Blackfoot tribes as well as allied Cheyenne tribes fought against Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer’s 7th Calvary by Montana’s Little Bighorn River on June 25, 1876.

Most Native American warriors survived.

According to reports, Little Bighorn’s paranormal phenomena include ghosts, poltergeist activity and electronic voice phenomena (EVP).


This Day in History: 06/25/1876 - Battle of Little Bighorn - HISTORY

Posted on 06/25/2008 8:29:22 AM PDT by MplsSteve

Today is the anniversary of one of the more controversial battles in US history - one that has been debated over and over for years.

On this day in 1876, Genl George A Custer and large share of the US 7th Cavalry were killed in a battle near the Little Bighorn River in Montana.

Because many of us on Free Republic enjoy history as well as debating history, I wanted to post this to see what you all have to say about this battle?

Who's fault was it? Did Custer have a bad battle plan? Or did Reno and Benteern not follow orders? What about recent archeological digs showing that Custer's men may have lost because of excessive jamming of their carbines, this affecting their rate of fire? Anything other thoughts you may have?

Comments or opinions - anyone?

I would surmise that the Indians learned a bit on how Yellow Hair fought and adjusted under the leadership of the likes of Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull.

I have read A Terrible Glory. It is an outstanding work, balanced and well-researched. James Donovan gives the reader a lot of context. You come away really understanding the battle.

This probably was one of history’s greatest “Oh Crap!” moments. Seriously, however, if you look at the layout of the battlefield, and the placement of the headstones, you can get a real idea of the type of emotions that must have run through the minds of the soldiers as they were overwhelmed.

Custer’s big problem that day was that he wore an Arrow Shirt

Custer’s big problem that day was that he wore an Arrow Shirt

it’s ok one of my favorite songs when I was a little kid was “Throw mama from the train, a kiss”.

Thanks for the feedback, appreciate it.

I get a haircut every June 25th to memorialize the Battle of Little Bighorn!

One thing that the defenders of the Wagon Box and Rorke’s Drift has going for them were relatively clear and flat fields of fire.

I saw the Wagon Box site (and hope someday to see Isandhlwana/Rorke’s Drift) and I was surprised at how flat the land was in the valley where the battle happened.

Combine the terrain factor with the big factor that the Wagon Box and Rorke’s Drift defenders had a steady and concentrated rate of fire.

Both the losers of Little Big Horn and Isandhlwana suffered from having their forces scattered too thinly (across the battlefield) as well as being out in the open.

"Excuse me Mr. Gambini, but did you say. "Utes?"

I am not criticizing the officers and men under Custer's command. I am criticizing the commander. I am criticizing him from a professional, not emotional perspective. His men died because of his arrogance, stupidity and ego.

What is worse, his men trusted him and he betrayed that trust!

“Also his plan was that he had no plan, he refused to listen to his Scouts, and refused to do the necessary preparatory work, such as scouting out and finding what he was up against.”

You contradict yourself. On the one hand you say he refused to listen to his scouts (true enough, to the extent he didn’t believe them) and then, on the other hand, you say he didn’t “. do the necessary preparatory work, such as scouting out and finding what he was up against.” Well, which was it? Did he not listen to his scouts or did he not send them out?

The fact is he had some of the ablest scouts available, including Mitch Bouyer (a protege of Jim Bridger), George Herendeen, “Lonesome” Charley Reynolds, the Jackson brothers, a whole slew of very good Crow and Ree (Arikara) scouts, and Isaiah Dorman (though he was there more as an interpreter than a scout).

Custer’s error was in not believing his scouts when they told him he had come across the largest concentration of Indians anyone there had ever seen. Remember, there was no radio or telephone back then, so Custer was entirely clueless as to the fight on the Rosebud against Crook just one week earlier, when Crook was confronted by an enormous number of hostiles, more than had ever before met an American military force (and that was before many other hostiles, who were still enroute, had arrived).

Custer didn't have a larger plan (although reconnaissance was more difficult in those days, it certainly wasn't impossible), and he also didn't believe those scouting reports that he did have.

He also dismissed his scouts because after he refused to believe them, they took off their uniforms and put on their Crow war dress because they fully expected to die and wanted to die as Crow warriors.

Unfortunately he was a glory seeker, and saw himself as a "man of destiny". To the extent he deluded himself and led his men to unnecessary death, that was a bad thing.

But there's a thin line between heroism and foolhardiness, not to mention lunacy. Nobody would deny that Patton was a very good general . . . but he was a PITA (my dad served under him) and also extremely peculiar. He was a hard-charger but not as reckless as Custer -- although several times he was overruled when he wanted to advance and keep on advancing.

Just think how different this would have turned out if they’d had cell phones.

“Benteen, come quick, I need. damn, HELLO? Hello? Can you hear me now? Yes, I said I need. Hello. ”

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.


June 25, 1876: Battle of the Greasy Grass (Battle of Little Big Horn)

Marker stone at the Little Bighorn Battlefield, Montana. Photo by Mark A. Wilson, public domain.

On June 25, 1876, at the Battle of the Greasy Grass (Battle of Little Big Horn) Lakota, Arikara, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho defended Sioux and Cheyenne families living in south central Montana in a battle with the Seventh Regiment of the United States Cavalry.

As explained in An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, adapted by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza:

In June 1876, a large encampment of nontreaty Sioux and Cheyenne families was gathered along the Little Bighorn River. Later that month, Custer and the Seventh Cavalry prepared to attack the encampment, but warriors led by Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull successfully intercepted them. Most textbooks call this the Battle of the Little Bighorn, but Lakota and Cheyenne people, especially those whose ancestors defended the encampment villages, know it as the Battle of the Greasy Grass.

Sioux chief Sitting Bull and Lakota leader Crazy Horse directed their warriors against Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer’s regiment of over 225 cavalry men near the Little Bighorn River. Custer and his men died in the battle, and the united tribes claimed victory over the U.S. military that week.

But the victory against the United States was short-lived. Crazy Horse died in 1877 in U.S. military custody, as that government worked steadily to disarm the nations of the western plains and force their people onto reservations. Sitting Bull lived another 14 years and was murdered at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation by an Indian Agent. He was targeted for his political power and his participation in the anti-imperialist spiritual movement, Ghost Dance.

Marble markers for the Seventh Cavalry were erected in 1890, but it was not until Memorial Day of 1999 that red granite markers were added to the historic site to honor the memory of the Lakota, Sioux, Arikara, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho who died the week of the Battle of Greasy Grass.

Students can learn about the struggle over representation of history at other monuments in the film Monumental Myths and in the related resources listed below.

Related Resources

“All the Real Indians Died Off”: And 20 Other Myths about Native Americans

Book – Non-fiction. By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker. 2016.
Deconstructs persistent myths about American Indians rooted in fear and prejudice—an astute and lively primer of European-Indian relations.

In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse

Book – Fiction. By Joseph Marshall III. Illustrations by Jim Yellowhawk. 2015. 176 pages.
A contemporary Native American boy learns about the history of Crazy Horse in a journey with his grandfather.

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People

Book – Non-fiction. By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz adapted by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza. 2019. 244 pages.
The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers.

Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong

Book – Non-fiction. By James Loewen. 512 pages. 2019.
The mis-education provided by monuments and historic markers across the United States.

Monumental Myths

Film. Directed by Tom Trinley. 2004. 47 minutes.
Inspired by the book, Lies Across America, this film presents the historic myths and facts about a few iconic monuments in the United States.

Dec. 26, 1862: Mass Execution of Dakota Indians

The mass execution of 38 Dakota Indians was ordered by President Abraham Lincoln.

Sept. 5, 1877: Murder of Tasunka Witko (Crazy Horse)

Tasunka Witko (Chief Crazy Horse) was murdered by the U.S. military.

Feb. 27, 1973: Activists Occupy Wounded Knee

About 250 Sioux Indians, led by members of the American Indian Movement, converged on South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Reservation, launching the famous 71-day occupation of Wounded Knee.

April 1, 2016: Standing Rock Sioux Oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)

The Standing Rock Sioux and allies founded a Spirit Camp along the proposed route of the bakken oil pipeline, Dakota Access to protest the route’s construction and to raise awareness of its threat.


This Day in History: 06/25/1876 - Battle of Little Bighorn - HISTORY

On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana’s Little Bighorn River.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux tribe on the Great Plains, strongly resisted the mid-19th-century efforts of the U.S. government to confine their people to reservations. In 1875, after gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills, the U.S. Army ignored previous treaty agreements and invaded the region. This betrayal led many Sioux and Cheyenne tribesmen to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. By the late spring of 1876, more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp along the Little Bighorn River–which they called the Greasy Grass–in defiance of a U.S. War Department order to return to their reservations or risk being attacked.

In mid-June, three columns of U.S. soldiers lined up against the camp and prepared to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on June 17. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for enemy troops. On the morning of June 25, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead rather than wait for reinforcements.

At mid-day, Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley. Among the Native Americans, word quickly spread of the impending attack. The older Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children, while Crazy Horse set off with a large force to meet the attackers head on. Despite Custer’s desperate attempts to regroup his men, they were quickly overwhelmed. Custer and some 200 men in his battalion were attacked by as many as 3,000 Native Americans within an hour, Custer and every last one of his soldier were dead.

The Battle of Little Bighorn–also called Custer’s Last Stand–marked the most decisive Native American victory and the worst U.S. Army defeat in the long Plains Indian War. The gruesome fate of Custer and his men outraged many white Americans and confirmed their image of the Indians as wild and bloodthirsty. Meanwhile, the U.S. government increased its efforts to subdue the tribes. Within five years, almost all of the Sioux and Cheyenne would be confined to reservations.

Comments

On this day in 1876, Native American forces led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeat the U.S. Army troops of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer in a bloody battle near southern Montana’s Little Bighorn River.

Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, leaders of the Sioux tribe on the Great Plains, strongly resisted the mid-19th-century efforts of the U.S. government to confine their people to reservations. In 1875, after gold was discovered in South Dakota’s Black Hills, the U.S. Army ignored previous treaty agreements and invaded the region. This betrayal led many Sioux and Cheyenne tribesmen to leave their reservations and join Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse in Montana. By the late spring of 1876, more than 10,000 Native Americans had gathered in a camp along the Little Bighorn River–which they called the Greasy Grass–in defiance of a U.S. War Department order to return to their reservations or risk being attacked.

In mid-June, three columns of U.S. soldiers lined up against the camp and prepared to march. A force of 1,200 Native Americans turned back the first column on June 17. Five days later, General Alfred Terry ordered Custer’s 7th Cavalry to scout ahead for enemy troops. On the morning of June 25, Custer drew near the camp and decided to press on ahead rather than wait for reinforcements.

At mid-day, Custer’s 600 men entered the Little Bighorn Valley. Among the Native Americans, word quickly spread of the impending attack. The older Sitting Bull rallied the warriors and saw to the safety of the women and children, while Crazy Horse set off with a large force to meet the attackers head on. Despite Custer’s desperate attempts to regroup his men, they were quickly overwhelmed. Custer and some 200 men in his battalion were attacked by as many as 3,000 Native Americans within an hour, Custer and every last one of his soldier were dead.


Real Bird family Battle of the Little Bighorn reenactment returns this weekend

GARRYOWEN - June 25, 1876 marks an infamous date in U.S. history – Custer’s Last Stand.

145 years later, Jim Real Bird and his brothers Henry and Mark host Battle of the Little Bighorn reenactment events on their land.

It all started with a movie scene filmed in the late 1960s.

“We were warriors in Little Big Man. This was the camp for Little Big Man. Some of the scenes in Little Big Man, the old movie, it was right here. We rode off of that cliff right there. The first scene we ever did,” said Jim Real Bird.

“Now I kinda just run parking. I used to do the warrior scenes, but now I’m in the parking lot, but I’m still involved,” said Jim with a laugh.

This weekend’s reenactments come after 2020’s reenactments were canceled due to the pandemic.

“We’re expecting really big crowds and a better show,” Real Bird said.

Located between Crow Agency and Garryowen, the reenactment site sits along the three-mile stretch where the encampment for the Lakota, Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors stood when George Armstrong Custer met his demise.

“We’re still doing this battle thing, it just part of our family, because of the land,” Real Bird said.

He describes it as a land with strong spiritual ties.

“Everything I do, it’s from the land, the creator is right here for us every day,” Real Bird said.

“All these visitors that come, we welcome all people for three days. And they have their own relationship with this land, and then they keep coming back,” Real Bird said.

His family’s horses are what Real Bird believes makes the reenactment come to life.

“We set up the sound, electricity, and all that. Actually, these, with the land and the background, what you see. We’re just all part of it. Like, temporarily. We like to think different though, as people,” Real Bird said with a laugh.

The reenactments are scheduled to take place on Friday, June 25, Saturday, June 26, and Sunday, June 27 at 1 p.m.

To get to the reenactment site, turn onto Whistling Water Loop from the East Frontage Road between Garryowen and Crow Agency.

Click here to visit the Real Bird reenactment website for more information.


Learn More

  • Take a look at the Library of Congress Research Guide Rosie the Riveter: Working Women and World War II.
  • The Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division holds hundreds of images relating to American women workers in World War II. To see the factory where Rosalind P. Walter worked, search the collections for Vought-Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation. offers a selection of photographs, as well as information on locating additional images. the collections of the Veterans History Project to find oral histories and other materials related to women working in the war industries during World War II.
  • Explore Library of Congress Digital Collections, including the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Color Photographs and the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives. Both collections feature an extensive pictorial record of American life during World War II.
  • Read Today in History features on D-Day: Operation Overlord, Pearl Harbor, and more.
  • View a selection of posters from the collections of the National Archives in the online exhibit Powers of Persuasion: Poster Art from World War II. Find the Rosie poster in Part I, under the section It’s a Woman’s War Too!.

The Mystery Behind Custer’s Last Stand and the Battle of Little Bighorn

A visit to the Battle of Little Bighorn in Montana can provide greater understanding of Custer's Last Stand, and the motivations of the combatants.

Key Point: Archaeological work has helped uncover much about Custer’s attack, although some aspects remain unclear to this day.

A single cavalryman burst from the copse in mid-afternoon on June 25, 1876, riding hell-bent for the swift flowing river. In seconds, others followed. The jumbled group of retreating cavalry thundered across the flats bound for high ground on the opposite side of the river.

The first rider was Major Marcus Reno. Without saying anything to his troops, he had abandoned the woods in a panic. His 130-man detachment had been pinned down in a stand of timber on the west bank of the Little Bighorn River after attacking the southern end of the sprawling Lakota and Cheyenne camp.

As the cavalrymen rode, a dust cloud formed behind them. Smoke billowed skyward from grass fires set earlier by the Indians to force the cavalry out of their position. Some of the Indians fired on the retreating cavalry with their Winchester and Henry repeaters, while others gave chase. The Indians in pursuit fired arrows into the backs of the terrified cavalrymen. Some overtook their foe and struck them with their tomahawks.

Bloodbath at the Ford

When Reno’s men reached the 15-foot embankment, they rode straight over the edge. The sound of each horse’s belly hitting the water was like a cannon shot, said Brave Bear. Warriors on both banks fired at point-blank range into the struggling mass of men and horses in the water.

In a frenzy of bloodlust, a number of Indians jumped into the river. Crazy Horse fought ferociously against the cavalrymen who earlier that day had fired into the tipis of his people. “[Crazy Horse] pulled them off their horses when they tried to get across the river where the bank was steep,” wrote Wooden Leg.

After the bloodbath at the ford, the survivors regrouped at 4:10 PM on a 200-foot bluff on the east side of the river. The survivors were about to ride away when Lieutenant Luther Hare entreated his fellow soldiers to make a stand.

“If we’ve got to die, let’s die here like men,” said Hare. Reno, hearing Hare’s appeal, suddenly regained his composure and ordered his men to take up a defensive position. The major had about 80 men left in his detachment. Ten of his men had died in the timber stand and another 40 had perished in the retreat. He was heavily outnumbered, and he desperately needed help.

The 1876 Campaign Against the Lakotas

Although the U.S government signed a treaty at Fort Laramie, Wyoming, in 1868 with the Northern Plains Indians that guaranteed them protection on a reservation in eastern Wyoming, the flood of gold miners into the area in 1874 unraveled the efforts for peace in the region.

Infuriated by the actions of miners and settlers, the Lakota and Cheyenne tribes began hit and run attacks on miners, settlers, and travelers in the region. The Bureau of Indian Affairs ordered the tribes back to the reservation by January 31, 1876. When they did not comply, the army began military operations to force them to comply.

Three Columns Converge on Sitting Bull’s Army

The U.S. Army’s strategy was for three expeditions to converge on Chief Sitting Bull’s Lakota and Cheyenne peoples in southeastern Montana. One of the expeditions was headed by General Alfred H. Terry based at Fort Abraham Lincoln in Dakota Territory. While marching up the Yellowstone River, Terry dispatched Colonel George A. Custer to take the 7th Cavalry and maneuver so as to strike Sitting Bull’s camp in the Little Bighorn Valley from the south. Sitting Bull’s camp consisted of about 7,000 people, of which there were 1,500 to 2,000 warriors.

Custer and his 600 men located the Indian camp and began their attack on June 25. Custer divided his force into three columns. He took five companies, and he assigned three companies each to Reno and Captain Frederick W. Benteen. One company was left to guard the pack train. Custer told Benteen to scout the high ground south of the Indian camp. He ordered Benteen to attack from the south, while he rode to attack it from a point further north.

Custer’s Last Dispatch Indicated His Dire Situation

Reno fell back to the bluff on the east bank after his disastrous repulse in the morning. He was joined a short time later by Benteen. Benteen had moved toward the camp when he received a message from Custer that read: “Come on. Big Village, be quick, bring packs.”

The men of the seven companies heard heavy firing to their north. It eventually ended. A company-sized force led by Captain Thomas B. Weir reconnoitered north, but could not locate Custer’s force. The other companies followed and joined Weir’s force. The Indians swooped down on the force in large numbers. The cavalrymen entrenched and fought off Indian attacks into the next day. Archaeological work has helped uncover much about Custer’s attack, although some aspects remain unclear to this day.

17-Stop Driving Tour Covers Both Battlefields

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is located within the Crowe Indian Reservation and is situated about one mile west of I-90/U.S. 87.

The battle unfolded over a five-mile swath of the Little Bighorn Valley. Custer Battlefield is on the north end, and Reno-Benteen Battlefield is on the south end.

The Visitor Center is located near the Deep Ravine at Custer Battlefield. A 17-stop driving tour covers both battlefields. Of particular interest in the southern sector is Stop 5 where Reno and Benteen made their hilltop defense, and also Stop 6 where Custer observed the progress of Reno’s attack before advancing north. Later in the battle, Lakota and Cheyenne warriors used the same location, which became known as Sharpshooter Ridge, to harass the men of the seven companies that survived the battle.

Markers Indicate Where Men of Both Sides Fell

Stops 11-17 lie within Custer Battlefield. Stop 12 marks where Custer’s men vainly launched a counterattack to break up warriors massing for a major attack. Stop 13 marks where Custer’s companies briefly reunited in the face of determined assaults by the Indians. Stop 16, a must-see site, is Last Stand Hill where Custer and approximately 41 men met their fate. Custer fell near the site of the present-day 7th Cavalry memorial.

The plains landscape is dotted with gray headstones that mark where Custer’s men fell, as well as red granite markers that denote known locations where Lakota and Cheyenne warriors fell.


On This Day: June 25

On June 25, 1876, Lt. Col. George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry were slaughtered by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the Battle of Little Big Horn in Montana.

On June 25, 1887, George Abbott, American playwright, director, actor and producer, was born. Following his death on Jan. 31, 1995, his obituary appeared in The Times.

On This Date

1788 Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution.
1868 Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina were readmitted to the Union.
1950 War broke out on the Korean peninsula as forces from the communist North invaded the South.
1951 The first commercial color telecast took place as CBS transmitted a one-hour special from New York to four other cities.
1962 The Supreme Court ruled that the use of an unofficial, nondenominational prayer in New York public schools was unconstitutional.
1967 The Beatles performed a new song, "All You Need Is Love," during a live international telecast.
1973 Former White House Counsel John Dean began testifying before the Senate Watergate Committee.
1991 The Yugoslav republics of Croatia and Slovenia declared their independence.
1995 Warren E. Burger, the 15th chief justice of the United States, died at age 87.
1996 A truck bomb killed 19 Americans and injured hundreds at a U.S. military housing complex in Saudi Arabia.
1997 An unmanned cargo ship crashed into Russia&aposs Mir space station, knocking out half of the station&aposs power and rupturing a pressurized laboratory.
1998 The Supreme Court rejected a line-item veto law as unconstitutional.
2005 Hardline Tehran Mayor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was declared the winner of Iran&aposs presidential runoff election.
2009 Michael Jackson died at age 50 from an overdose of the powerful anesthetic propofol. (The singer&aposs doctor, Conrad Murray, was convicted of involuntary manslaughter.)

Historic Birthdays

George Abbott 6/25/1887 - 1/31/1995 American theatrical director, producer, playwright and actor.Go to obituary »
79 Edward Holyoke 6/25/1689 - 1/1/1769
American educator president of Harvard University (1737-69)
73 Antonio Gaudi 6/25/1852 - 6/10/1926
Spanish (Catalan) architect
64 Robert Henri 6/25/1865 - 7/12/1929
American painter
47 Crystal Eastman 6/25/1881 - 7/8/1928
American lawyer, suffragist and writer
66 Benito Lynch 6/25/1885 - 12/23/1951
Argentine novelist and short story writer
63 Henry Harley Arnold 6/25/1886 - 1/15/1950
American military strategist
95 Hermann Oberth 6/25/1894 - 12/29/1989
Austrian-born German scientist
79 Lord Louis Mountbatten 6/25/1900 - 8/27/1979
English statesman, naval leader and last viceroy of India
68 William H. Stein 6/25/1911 - 2/2/1980
American Nobel Prize-winning biochemist (1972)

An earlier version of this feature misstated the casualties suffered by Lt. Col. Custer’s regiment at the Battle of Little Bighorn. His 7th Cavalry suffered heavy losses it was not “wiped out.”


Consequences of the Battle

The Battle of the Little Bighorn represented the worst defeat for the U.S Army during the Indian war and reinforced the idea that white Americans had of Native Americans being dangerous and wild. Because of this, efforts to confine the tribes into reservations were increased, and in five years most of the Sioux and Cheyenne tribes were imprisoned in reservations.

The site of the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana now houses the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Today, it is a memorial for those who lost their lives during the battle on both the 7th cavalry and the Native American forces. However, for many years following the battle, the place were the fighting took place was only a national cemetery and the place of rest for Custer and his troops. While the cemetery still stands, in 1991 the United States government recognized the sacrifices of the Native American people, and an Indian Memorial was built in honor of their warriors, themed "Peace Through Unity".


Watch the video: 25th June 1876: Battle of Little Bighorn u0026 Custers Last Stand (August 2022).