Articles

History of Sheffield United

History of Sheffield United



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Football was a very popular sport in Sheffield and in 1857 a group of men established the Sheffield Football Club at Bramall Lane. It is believed to be the first football club in the world. Two former Harrow students, Nathaniel Creswick and William Prest, published their own set of rules for football. These new rules allowed for more physical contact than those established by some of the public schools. Players were allowed to push opponents off the ball with their hands. It was also within the rules to shoulder charge players, with or without the ball. If a goalkeeper caught the ball, he could be barged over the line. At first the Sheffield Club played friendly games against teams in London and Nottingham.

In 1862 a new set of rules were established at Cambridge University. These specified 11-a-side, an umpire from each side plus a neutral referee, goals 12ft across and up to 20ft high. An offside rule was added. A man could play a ball passed to him from behind, so long as there were three opponents between him and the goal. It was also decided that each game should only last one hour and a quarter. The first game under these rules took place between the Old Etonians and Old Harrovians in November, 1862.

The Football Association was established in October, 1863. The aim of the FA was to establish a single unifying code for football. The first meeting took place at the Freeman's Tavern in London. The clubs represented at the meeting included Barnes, Blackheath, Perceval House, Kensington School, the War Office, Crystal Palace, Forest (later known as the Wanderers), the Crusaders and No Names of Kilburn. Charterhouse also sent an observer to the meeting.

In 1871, Charles W. Alcock, the Secretary of the Football Association, announced the introduction of the Football Association Challenge Cup. It was the first knockout competition of its type in the world. Only 12 clubs took part in the competition: Wanderers, Royal Engineers, Hitchin, Queens Park, Barnes, Civil Service, Crystal Palace, Hampstead Heathens, Great Marlow, Upton Park, Maidenhead and Clapham Rovers.

Many clubs did not enter for financial reasons. All ties had to be played in London. Clubs based in places such as Nottingham and Sheffield found it difficult to find the money to travel to the capital. Each club also had to contribute one guinea towards the cost of the £20 silver trophy.

The Sheffield Club joined the competition in the 1873-74 season. They reached the 3rd Round before being knocked out by Clapham Rovers. Despite having some good players such as W. H. Stacey, Daff Davy, Peter Andrews, Alf Liddell and T. Sorby, the club never did in very well in the Football Association Challenge Cup.

The Sheffield Club was determined to remain an amateur side and refused to join the Football League when it was formed in 1888. The following year, the Sheffield United Cricket Club decided to form a football team. Michael Ellison and John Wostinholm managed to recruit a group of talented footballers. This included Rab Howell who later played for England.

Sheffield United joined the Second Division of the Football League in 1892. In their first season the club was promoted to the First Division.

The team included William Foulke, Rab Howell and Ernest Needham, who were both to go on to win international caps for England. Foulke was considered to be the best goalkeeper in Britain. As one newspaper reported in 1895: "In Foulke, Sheffield United have a goalkeeper who will take a lot of beating. He is one of those lengthy individuals who can take a seat on the crossbar whenever he chooses, and shows little of the awkwardness usually characteristic of big men."

Ernest Needham played 16 times for his country at left-half. One journalist wrote: "There is one thing which has made Earnest Needham stand out of the common run of halves; he is neither a constructive nor a destructive half-back alone; he is both at once. One moment you will see him falling back to the defence of his own goal, or checking the speedy rush of his wing; the next, he is up with his forwards, feeding them to a nicety, and always making the best of every opening. Where he gets his pace from is a mystery. He never seems to be racing, yet he must be moving at racing pace; he never seems to be exhausted, yet in a big game he is practically doing three men's work."

In 1895 William Foulke and Ernest Needham had their wages increased to £3 a week, which included a retainer wage over the summer. Foulke and his team mates were also paid a ten-shilling (50p) bonus for an away win, and five shillings for a home win or away draw. Records show that for key games the players were paid £5 for a win. At the time, the average wage of a working man was about £1. However, someone with specialist skills could earn up to £2.50 a week.

In the 1896-97 season Sheffield United were runners-up behind the double-winning Aston Villa. The team conceded just 29 goals throughout the campaign and the club had easily the best defensive record in the Football League.

Sheffield United, led by Ernest Needham, won the First Division championship of the Football League in the 1897-1898 season. The club struggled the following year in the league but the team beat Derby County in the 1899 FA Cup Final.

In the 1896-97 season Sheffield United were runners-up behind the double-winning Aston Villa. The team conceded just 29 goals throughout the campaign and the club had easily the best defensive record in the Football League.

Sheffield United won the First Division championship of the Football League in the 1897-1898 season. The team included players such as William Foulke, Ernest Needham, Walter Bennett and George Hedley.

The club struggled the following year in the league but the team did reach the final of the 1899 FA Cup. Joan Boag scored for Derby County in the first-half. Sheffield United equalised when Walter Bennett headed home a Ernest Needham cross. The club added three more goals and won the final 4-1.

With William Foulke in goal and Ernest Needham organizing the back five, Sheffield United was a very difficult team to play against and in the 1899-1900 season they once again had the best defensive record in the league and finished in second place to Aston Villa.

Games involving two teams from the same town or city often resulted in violent play. In the 1899-1900 season, Sheffield Wednesday played Sheffield United in the second-round of the FA Cup. The first match had to be abandoned owing to a snow storm. The second game resulted in a 1-1 draw at Bramwell Lane. The game had been spoilt by a series of illegal tackles so according to the journalist, James Catton, the referee, John Lewis, "... visited the dressing-room of each set of players, and told them they must observe the laws and spirit of sport. He intimated that if any player committed an offence he would send him off the field."

This warning did not have the desired effect and the replay was one of the roughest in history. James Catton later reported: "In spite of this the tie had not been long in progress when a Wednesday man was sent to the dressing-room for jumping on to an opponent. Soon after that The Wednesday's centre-forward had his leg broken, but that was quite an accident. No blame attached to anyone. Another Wednesday player was ordered out of the arena for kicking an opponent... With two men in the pavilion reflecting on the folly of behaving brutally, and another with a broken leg, it is no wonder that The Wednesday lost the tie. Mr. Lewis always said that this was one of the two most difficult matches he ever had to referee. Memories of this kind abide. His task was formidable, and his duty far from enviable. The sequel was the suspension of two Wednesday players."

In the 1900-01 season Sheffield United beat Sunderland (2-1), Everton (2-0), Wolves (4-0) and Aston Villa (3-0) to reach the the final of the FA Cup against Tottenham Hotspur. The players were on a £10 win bonus. However, the Southern League side was on a promise of £25 a man if they won the cup. The game ended in a 2-2 draw. Spurs won the replay 3-1.

Sheffield United also had a good cup run in the 1901-02 season. They beat Northampton Town (2-0), Bolton Wanderers (2-1), Newcastle United (2-1) and Derby County (1-0) to reach the the final of the FA Cup against Southampton. Sheffield took an early lead but Southampton scored a controversial equalizer and the game was drawn. C. B. Fry wrote in the Southern Echo: "The outstanding feature of the match was the grand goalkeeping of Foulke. he made a number of good saves, and on two or three occasions cleared the ball from what appeared impossible positions. Once, near the end, from a corner, he effected an absolute miracle with four or five men right on to him."

William Foulke was furious that the equalizing goal had been given after the game he went searching for the referee. The linesman, J. T. Howcroft, described how Frederick Wall, secretary of the Football Association, tried to placate the goalkeeper: "Foulke was exasperated by the goal and claimed it was in his birthday suit outside the dressing room, and I saw F. J. Wall, secretary of the FA, pleading with him to rejoin his colleagues. But Bill was out for blood, and I shouted to Mr. Kirkham to lock his cubicle door. He didn't need telling twice. But what a sight! The thing I'll never forget is Foulke, so tremendous in size, striding along the corridor, without a stitch of clothing."

Walter Bennett was injured and could not take part in the replay. He was replaced by William Barnes on the wing. The game was only two minutes old when a massive clearing kick by Foulke reached George Hedley and Sheffield United took an early lead. Led by the outstanding Ernest Needham, Sheffield dominated play but Albert Brown managed to score a equalizer. Southampton began to apply pressure but according to the Athletic News, "Foulke was invincible". With ten minutes to go, Needham took a shot that the Southampton goalkeeper, John Robinson, could only block, and Barnes was able to hit the ball into the unguarded net. Sheffield won 2-1 and Foulke had won another medal.

After the game, Howard Vincent, the Member of Parliament for Sheffield Central, commented that "our giant goalkeeper Foulke, with his tremendous smite and prodigious kick, the best goalkeeper football has ever seen." Such was his fame that on 6th September 1902, Foulke was filmed by Sagar Mitchell and James Kenyon during a match (included in Edwardian Sports).

Soon after the game George Hedley was sold to Southampton. The following year Walter Bennett moved to Bristol City and in 1905 William Foulke was sold to Chelsea for a transfer fee of £50. Although Ernest Needham remained, the club went into decline.

Play was soon raging round the United goal, where after a bit of scuffling Taggart got an opening, and scored West Bromwich their first goal with rattling shot after ten minutes' play since the interval. The game after this became more exciting, and the play faster, but the combination was not so good on either side as at the opening...

After a corner to the United a similar advantage was conceded to the visitors."This was well dropped, and Foulke rushing out, cleared the ball cleverly, but to the surprise of everybody the referee allowed a penalty kick. That Foulke handled the ball was certain, and clearly apparent to all, but the referee held that in the scrimmage some other player had done so also. The penalty kick was taken by McLeod, but to the intense relief of the spectators the ball went outside, Foulke just touching it.

In goal Foulke, who was perhaps as much watched by the crowd as any other two men in the team, did his work well and performed his part with considerable credit. He might, perhaps, have got back to his place before Taggart scored the goal for Albion, but inasmuch as he had just saved grandly, his rashness is to be excused. He was by no means lightly tried, and came off vvith undoubted honours.

It has been my lot, and often my fortune, to watch exciting but fine ties between Everton and Liverpool, Sunderland and Newcastle United (one of these was the cleanest, cleverest, and most sporting match anyone could wish for), Notts County and Nottingham Forest, and West Bromwich Albion and Aston Villa, all neighbours' battles, but this particular match between The Wednesday and United of Sheffield was a bit of old Donnybrook.

Unless I am mistaken the match necessitated three attempts before a settlement. The first match had to be abandoned owing to a snowstorm, the second a week later produced a tie at Bramall Lane (1-1), and the third at Owlerton, two days later (February 19, 1900), resulted in the victory of the United by 2-0. Possibly there was never a more onerous task for a referee. Fortunately the controlling official was the late John Lewis of Blackburn. This tie must linger in memory as a very unpleasant affair.

The first game was typical of Cup-tie football, there being many stoppages for small offences. The replay was on the Monday. Before the game Mr. Lewis visited the dressing-room of each set of players, and told them they must observe the laws and the spirit of sport. He intimated that if any player committed an offence he would send him off the field.

In spite of this the tie had not been long in progress when a Wednesday man was sent to the dressing-room for jumping on to an opponent.

Soon after that The Wednesday's centre-forward had his leg broken, but that was quite an accident. Another Wednesday player was ordered out of the arena for kicking an opponent.

Mr. Lewis has told me that he did not see this offence, and that his line of sight was obstructed, but he acted, as he had the right to do, on the information of the neutral linesman, Mr. Grant, of Liverpool.

With two men in the pavilion reflecting on the folly of behaving brutally, and another with a broken leg, it is no wonder that The Wednesday lost the tie.

Mr. The sequel was the suspension of two Wednesday players.

For years afterwards it seemed as if ill-feeling between these clubs had died completely out until one day there was a sudden flare-up and a round of fisticuffs between Glennon, of The Wednesday, and W.H. Brelsford, of United. Clegg was sitting near me and he immediately said: "I thought all this animosity was a thing of the past." Still there was the manifestation-quick and vivid as lightning.

As the biggest man who ever played football, I have naturally had a few stories told about me, and I should just like to say that some of them are stories.You may have heard that there was a very great rivalry between the old Liverpool centre forward Allan and myself, that prior to one match we breathed fire and slaughter at each other, that at last he made a rush at me as I was saving a shot, and that I dropped the ball, caught him by the middle, turned him clean over in a twinkling, and stood him on his head, giving him such a shock that he never played again.

Well, the story is one which might be described as a "bit of each". In reality, Allan and I were quite good friends off the field. On it we were opponents, of course, and there's no doubt he was ready to give chaff for chaff with me. What actually happened on the occasion referred to was that Allan (a big strong chap, mind you) once bore down on me with all his weight when I was saving.

I bent forward to protect myself, and Allan, striking my shoulder, flew right over me and fell heavily. He had a shaking up, I admit, but quite the worst thing about the whole business was that the referee gave a penalty against us and it cost Sheffield United the match.

There is another story about an Everton forward, Bell, who had threatened me. They will tell you how I got the best of him by bowling him over, then rubbing his nose in the mud, and picking him up with one hand to give him to his trainer to be cared for.

It was really all an accident. Just as I was reaching for a high ball Bell came at me, and the result of the collision was that we both tumbled down, but it was his bad luck to be underneath, and I could not prevent myself front falling with both knees in his back.

At that time I weighed about twenty-two-and-a-half stone, and I knew I must have hurt him, but when I saw his face I got about the worst shock I ever have had on the football field. He looked as if he was dead. I picked him up in my arms as tenderly as a baby, and all I could say was "Oh dear! Oh dear!' But I am happy to say the affair was not so serious as it looked, and the Everton man came round all right.

Nobody is fonder of fun or "devilment" than I am, but nobody who knows me would suggest that I would try to hurt an opponent - though a few of them have hurt me in my time! Talking of fun, I don't mind admitting that I think I had as much as most men during my football career. To my mind almost the best time for a joke is after the team has lost.

When we'd won I was as ready to go to sleep in the railway carriage as anybody. All was peace and comfort then! But when we'd lost I made it my business to be a clown. Once when we were very disappointed I begged some black stuff from the engine driver and rubbed it over my face. There I was sitting on the table and playing some silly game, with all the team round me, laughing like kiddies at a Punch and Judy show, when some grumpy committeeman looked in. Ask the old team, the boys who won the League Championship once and the Cup twice, if a bit of "Little Willie's" foolery didn't help to chirp them up before a tough match.

I sometimes had a hard job to keep my temper on the field, though.You might have thought that forwards would steer clear of such a big chap. Some did, but others seemed to get wild when they couldn't get the ball into goal, and I suffered a lot through kicks administered when the referee wasn't looking.

Although it is more than five years since I gave up playing football, I can still show patches of bruising six inches long on my legs. There is one scar across thee shin which looks as if it will never fairly heal up.

The popular idea that football is a dangerous game will surely have to undergo modification, but we must acknowledge that it was formerly dangerous. Once broken limbs from kicks, and broken ribs from charges, were quite every-day occurrences, and, to a great extent, men went on the field with their lives in their hands. It is safe to say that now there is no more risk in playing, even a fast game, than there is in any other active sport.

Surely last season's freedom from accident in First Division matches is sufficient evidence of this. I do not remember that any player had a limb broken, and even the Second Division was almost equally free. The object of many changes in the rules has been to extend protection to those engaged, and especially to the goalkeeper. Never now can we see two or three men rush at this isolated guard, while another pops the ball through. To begin with, it is difficult to get near enough to him for a charge without the "off-side rule" coming into operation. Then, again, the last part of Rule 10 says, "The goalkeeper shall not be charged except when he is holding the ball, or obstructing an opponent"; and it is seldom, and not for long, that the custodian is in contact with the ball. It is safe to say that the goalkeeper is the best protected man on the field.


Sheffield

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Sheffield, town, city, and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, north-central England. Sheffield lies about 160 miles (260 km) northwest of London. The city and metropolitan borough lie within the historic county of Yorkshire, except for the area around Beighton and Mosborough, which belongs to the historic county of Derbyshire. Sheffield is situated at the foot of the Pennine highlands at a point where four streams—the Sheaf, Porter, Rivelin, and Loxley—running in deep valleys converge to form the River Don.

Escafeld, as the historic town of Sheffield was called at the time of Domesday Book (1086), was an Anglo-Saxon village. It became the site of a castle and a parish church built by the Norman lord William de Lovetot early in the 12th century. From medieval times the local iron ore was smelted with charcoal obtained from the nearby abundant woodlands, and smiths and cutlers used the excellent local sandstone for grindstones. During the 15th century the streams that converge on Sheffield began to be used for power for grinding and forging operations. A cutlery industry thus grew, and Sheffield emerged in the 17th century as the main provincial cutlery town and a powerful rival to London. By 1700 London, too, had been defeated, and thereafter Sheffield enjoyed a virtual monopoly of the English cutlery trade.

Sheffield was the site of several metallurgical innovations that greatly spurred its growth. In the early 1740s Benjamin Huntsman developed the crucible process of steelmaking, thereby obtaining a reliable tool steel that by 1830 had earned Sheffield recognition as the world centre of high-grade steel manufacture. About 1742 the Sheffield cutler Thomas Boulsover discovered the process of plating copper with silver by fusion, and the city became the chief production centre for articles made of Sheffield plate. Henry Bessemer’s new method (1856) of making inexpensive steel in large quantities was first tested and used in a factory at Sheffield, whose heavy steel industries grew greatly as a consequence. The process for making stainless steel also originated at Sheffield, about 1912. In 1911 census returns showed that Sheffield had surpassed Leeds as the most populous city in Yorkshire.

Although its industrial base underwent some shrinkage in the late 20th century, Sheffield is still a major British producer of raw steel, cutlery, and machinery. Food processing is also important. Sheffield is sited on a hill-and-valley system of great beauty, and both the moors of the Pennines and the wooded dales of Derbyshire sweep up to the very edge of the city’s residential areas. Outside the town of Sheffield, the metropolitan borough includes suburban areas and open countryside, including part of Peak District National Park. Sheffield is served by modern roads and is the major shopping and cultural centre in South Yorkshire. The University of Sheffield is especially known for its programs in metallurgy. The Town Hall (1897) is a notable civic building, and both the city museum and the Graves art gallery have fine collections. Sheffield also is the home of the National Centre for Popular Music. Area city and metropolitan borough, 142 square miles (368 square km). Pop. (2001) town, 439,866 city and metropolitan borough, 513,234 (2011) town, 518,090 city and metropolitan borough, 552,698.


History of Sheffield United - History

Click here for one fan's experience, meeting Sean at the Hall of Fame opening.

Click on the thumbnails to see larger pictures. A new window will open. Close the window after you've looked at the picture, then click on the next one.
Top: Screen caps from Lynn at The Faces and Voices of Sean Bean
Bottom: Photos by Karen Herbert

Click on the thumbnail to read the story in the Sheffield Star.

Sean Bean opens United's Hall of Fame
22 December 2001


Celebrity fan Sean Bean jetted in from America to open Sheffield United's Hall of Fame on Friday.
Fresh from his success in the blockbuster film Lord of the Rings, the '100% Blade' officially unveiled the venue on Friday afternoon which will bring alive the history of the Blades.

Bean, a lifelong United supporter, is a trustee of the Hall of Fame, a superb collection of United memorabilia from since the club was formed in 1889.

"This will be an opening night with a difference for me," said Bean. "As a true Blade this is a terrific honour to open a special attraction which brings alive the history of one of the country's best-known football clubs."

Bean was joined at the opening by a host of familiar faces from United's past. Alan Hodgkinson, Len Badger, Ted Hemsley and Keith Edwards were present, as well as the families of earlier greats such as Bill Foulke and Jimmy Hagan.

The magnificent collection is available to view by the public from Saturday - when the Blades take on Rotherham.

Sean's the Lord of the Blades for club's big day
Ian Waugh

THE biggest private collection of football memorabilia in the North of England will go on show to the public for the first time tomorrow. About £1m-worth of history associated with Sheffield United has been assembled at the club's Bramall Lane ground. And Lord of the Rings star and United fanatic Sean Bean has flown back from Los Angeles – where he is promoting the blockbuster film – just to open the "Hall of Fame".

Highlights include the ball used in United's first FA Cup Final victory against Derby County at Crystal Palace in 1899 and one of the enormous jerseys worn by the legendary 24-stone goalkeeper Billy "Fatty" Foulkes .

Hall of Fame manager John Garrett has worked for two years to track down the items from a range of sources.

He said: "It has been seven days a week travelling the length and breadth of England meeting families and going to auctions. I feel humble at times that people have put such faith in me and trust us with these things.

"We want the collection to be maintained and grow for future generations and keep the history of this great club where it should be."

Visitors will be able to see Billy Gillespie's Ireland international shirts, caps, and 1925 FA Cup winners' medal and medals from the only time United won the top-flight championship in 1898. Walter "Cocky" Bennett's 1900 England shirt is on show along with memorabilia of the great Jimmy Hagan who refused to sign for Sheffield Wednesday in what would have been a record transfer fee. More recent items include Tony Currie's first and last England shirts, Keith Edwards's "Golden Boots" and current Cameroon star Patrick Suffo's Olympic gold medal.

There is also a display for former Sheffield United striker of the 1960s Mick Jones who went on to become equally popular at Elland Road.

A trust is being formed to protect the collection and to raise funds and access grants to enlarge the Hall of Fame.

Mr Garrett added: "Sean Bean saw the chance of putting something back in to the club that has given him so much pleasure and pain and he has agreed to be a trustee and he is flying back from America especially to be with us.

"We hope the trust will be able to introduce IT systems for schoolchildren to make it more hands-on with audio tape of some of the great names.

"One thing you realise putting this together is that we haven't won anything for over 70 years but we are a great club with a great history and proud tradition."

The club is still gathering more artifacts and it is desperately trying to trace the balls used in the 1915 and 1925 FA Cup finals – both won by United.

Sean Bean, renowned for his "100 per cent Blade" tattoo, will use his sword from the TV series Sharpe to cut the ribbon to officially open the centre. He will be joined by invited guests, including the families of a host of former United greats.

Blades fanatic cuts short US trip


LORD of the Rings star and Sheffield United fanatic Sean Bean is to fly back to Yorkshire straight after the film's American premiere to open the football club's new Hall of Fame next month.

The Sheffield-born actor will use his sword from the TV series Sharpe to cut the ribbon to open officially the Bramall Lane venue which is set to bring alive the history of the Blades.

Bean, a lifelong United supporter, is a trustee of the Hall of Fame, which is a collection of United memorabilia including articles whichdate back to when the club was formed in 1889.

"This will be a opening night with a difference for me," said Bean. "As a true Blade this is a terrific honour to open a special attraction which brings alive the history of one of the country's best-known football clubs."

At the opening on Friday, December 21, Bean will be joined by specially invited guests, including the families of former United greats Billy Foulkes, Billy Gillespie and Jimmy Hagan.

Others will include Alan Hodgkinson, Tony Currie and Cec Coldwell.

Donations to the South Stand-based Hall of Fame, which will be open to the public the following day, include Billy Gillespie's international shirts, caps, and Blades 1925 FA Cup winners' medal, shirts belonging to the legendary 22-stone giant goalkeeper Billy "Fatty" Foulkes plus the ball used in United's first FA Cup Final victory against Derby County at Crystal in 1899.

Hall of Fame manager John Garrett said: "The support we have received from so many former players and their families has been tremendous.

"The result is a Premiership collection of footballing history and memories which will delight anyone with an interest in soccer."

All monies raised by the Hall of Fame are ploughed back into increasing the size of the collection and maintaining it for years to come.

Sean Bean opens the Hall of Fame

The long history of Sheffield United began in 1889 but on the evening of Friday 21 December 2001 it was finally put on public view as the Club's much anticipated Hall of Fame was opened in the South Stand.

An invited audience of players and contributors was thrilled to see the former Social Club transformed into a wonderland in which the Blades' journey is charted though a vast collection of memorabilia and photographs.

Museum and Archive Manager, John Garrett, Football Club Chairman Derek Dooley, historian Denis Clarebrough, and Hall of Fame Trustee Gary Armstrong, all gave their thoughts on what is reckoned to be only the fifth such club facility in the country - after Manchester United, Liverpool, Arsenal, and Aston Villa.

Then, with the region's media also anxious to record the moment, United's own superstar celebrity 100% Blade, Sean Bean, marked the occasion by performing the official opening (picture courtesy of Sheffield Newspapers).

The doors were opened to the public on the following day when the Blades played Rotherham United, and a very healthy number of supporters made a first day visit.

The Hall of Fame idea was first seriously mooted around 1999 with John Garrett and Club Accountant, Dominic Field, the prime movers. Although the Board sanctioned the idea in principle the scale, speed and success of the search was to take everyone by surprise.

Once the first appeal for items to be donated was made and publicity generated, a never ending trail of detective work began. Family trees were explored and long lost contacts found as treasured or even forgotten items of memorabilia were unearthed from carrier bags in attics and front room mantelpieces.

Billy Foulke's gigantic shirt, 'Nudger' Needham's medals, and Jimmy Hagan's boots are now all on display, along with life-size photographs of legends from over a century of United history.

"It has been a labour of love for me to get all this stuff together for the team I have supported since I was five years old," says Garrett.

"We are hoping when people read about it and come to visit it will bring in even more memorabilia. We know there is a lot of stuff still out there."

"We want to extend what we have done and get in some interactive stuff so kids can type in the name of a player and see pictures, information and, where available, video clips."

There will be no trouble portraying the players from the modern era, of course, but some of stories of the heroes from long ago are long on tragedy and real heroism.

England star Walter Bennett won a First Division Championship medal with United in 1898 and went back to life as a miner after he finished, only to be killed in Denaby pit at the age of 34.

Families of ex-United players went hungry in the depression of the thirties rather than sell their dads' and grandads' medals.

The process of finding some of those precious items brought to light long-standing family splits, quarrels and grudges, and owed much to the tenacity and persuasive nature of John Garrett.

"Tracking down relatives of past players has been a real eye-opener for me. Sometimes I have just had a name and an area and started ploughing through the telephone book. It has worked on a few occasions and has brought in some wonderful stuff," he says.

"I found the Walter Bennett collection after a relative of a former reserve player told me his family
were still in Mexborough.

"There are hundreds of Bennetts in Mexbrough but I managed to find a relation who had his championship medal and his England shirt.

"There aren't a lot of England shirts around from that era. They were made of good quality cotton and people used to cut them up for dusters.

"But the Bennett family had Walter's things and they would have been poor people. He was working at the pit and left four kids but his family kept all his things.

"It's a very touching and humbling experience to be trusted with medals, caps, and other precious items that have been cherished by families for 80 or 90 years. The good name of Sheffield United stands for a lot. People love this club."

Billy Gillespie's Ireland shirt, Keith Edwards' three golden boot awards, Patrick Suffo's shirt and Olympic gold medal, Mick Jones' England cap, the patched up segments of the 1899 FA Cup Final ball and faded pictures of long forgotten FA Cup winners.

They are all there, along with special sections on the likes of Alf Ringstead, Joe Shaw, Graham Shaw, Dane Whitehouse and Alan Kelly. The hope now is that United players continue to make their own contributions, although special achievement is only one part of the Sheffield United story - the quirky and routine can also be recognised.

All contributions, donated or loaned, will be gratefully accepted, leads followed up, and stories told in
order that Blades' fans the world over can celebrate their club.

This is just the start, and the collection will be built and changed so that the Hall of Fame will be a
constantly evolving record of our Club. Come and see it - opening times and admission details can be checked by ringing direct on 0114 2213153.

What they say about the Hall of Fame

Sean Bean: "The Hall of Fame is brilliant. It is an honour and privilege for me to open it in an official capacity, very different from the opening night for the 'Lord of the Rings', but this is my club's history - I was delighted to be asked to be here."

John Garrett: "Thanks to the club, I've had the time to go out and trace people who have been able to help our quest to make this one of the best museums in the country. A sincere thank you to everyone who has helped progress this project to what it is. Every player who has played for Sheffield United has a right to be in the Hall of Fame. We want this collection to grow and grow."

David Hagan - son of Jimmy: "I'm flabbergasted, and so impressed with how it looks. The items assembled are unbelievable, far better than I envisaged. It may have only just opened but I am confident that this is one of the best in the country."

Jock Dodds - Blades striker and oldest surviving FA Cup Final player: "It couldn't be better. Just looking at all the medals, shirts and memorabilia assembled is unbelievable. It is a credit to the club and everyone who has been involved should take a lot of credit."

Alan Hodgkinson - former Blades goalkeeper and England International: "Obviously, on my travels, I have seen many museums but this compares. I compliment John Garrett on all the outstanding work he has done. I am delighted to see it for myself and I think the public will be impressed too. Remembering the past is great and all this brings back a lot of memories for me."

Derek Dooley: "I've watched it grow from the start and it looks magnificent. Thanks to everyone who has contributed, and to Sean Bean for giving his time in what must be a very busy schedule."

Denis Clarebrough - Club historian: "As a Unitedite since birth you can imagine my feelings tonight. I would like to thank the Directors, staff and families of players that have made this possible. It is occasions like this that make a Football Club more than just a business. Sheffield has played a part in football history and, hopefully, that will also draw people to United's Hall of Fame."

Gary Armstrong - author and trustee: "There are very many emotions evident tonight. One of which is surprise - who would have thought that this was possible?"

Mick Jones - ex player
"It looks fantastic and is a must for Sheffield
United fans. Everything looks great, depicting this club from
1889 until the present day."

Ted Hemsley - ex player: "To me it looks brilliant. The response has been brilliant and all the hard work that has been put in has been rewarded. The lads from our era who will see the display will think that it sums us up completely."


History

Methodism began in Sheffield as far back as 1869 with a charge known as the Union Ridge Circuit, comprising of Rockwell, Lymann’s Schoolhouse, Old Chapin, Owen’s Grove and Shobe’s Grove (later known as McKenzie Church.) In 1875 Rockwell became the head of the circuit including Sheffield and Chapin.

In April 1880, property was purchased from Charles C. Gilman on the corner of 5th and Borst Streets and the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Sheffield was incorporated. Trustees were R.F. Sullivan, James Green, H.D. Hocking, Joseph Perrin and L.B. Carhart. A church was built in 1881 at the cost of $2,250. Rev. Coleman was its first pastor.

The east half of the block where the church now stands (5th and Thompson) was acquired in 1888 and the church was moved. The house north of the church served as the parsonage. In 1906, Rev. Witzingman was the minister and an addition was built on the east side of the church structure and the First Methodist Episcopal Church was dedicated.

In 1908, a church choir was organized with Rev. Witzigman as leader and the following were members: Florence Yelland, Blanche Whitney, Eliza Wunn, Nellie Wartnaby, Nellie Brewster, Mrs. Parker, O.J. Gross, M.R. Brewster, E.W. James, C.J. LeValley, Mrs. Schmidt, L.B. Carhart, Wm. Schaefer, Mayme Wunn, Olive Sullivan, Vera Heffner, Carrie Wunn, Minnie Ingebretson and Else Bigg.

The present parsonage west of the church was built in 1914.

In 1920, the McKenzie Church was closed and many families transferred their membership to the “town church.” Pioneer families of this congregation included: Homs, Hunt, Clark, Yelland, Hovey, Wilhelm, Store, Rowe, Engebretson, Peter, Ward, Thomas and Rawson.

Rev. Frank P. Schaefer was pastor when the 50th anniversary of the congregation was celebrated in 1931. After the reunion of the Methodist denominations in 1939, the congregation became known as First Methodist Church. In January 1944, the charge no longer included Rockwell, and Rev. Charles G. Fort became Sheffield’s first full-time pastor. During Rev. Fort’s tenure, the current church building was built. The congregation voted for the new church at regular morning worship in February 1953. The last communion in the old church was held in April 1953 and the last worship service was held one week later. Formal services to commemorate the laying of a cornerstone were held in October 1953 with Dr. Lloyd Gustafson officiating. The first worship service in the new church was held Easter Sunday, April 18, 1954, consecration in May 1954, and the dedication was held in October 1959.

Rev. Frank Nichols was pastor at the time of dedication. The only recorded visit by a Methodist Bishop to Sheffield was for Rev. Nichols’ service of ordination in April 1957, performed by Bishop F. Gerald Ensley.

Rev. Paul Huscher was minister in 1968 when the merger of the Evangelical United Brethren Church and First Methodist Church was approved in Dallas, Texas. This resulted in the name of the church becoming First United Methodist Church. Years later, several of the families from the former Zion Evangelical United Brethren congregation would become part of First United Methodist Church.

In 1983 the Narthex, with room for gathering and congregating before and after worship, was added to the building.

Salem United Methodist Church in Chapin closed in 2007 and many of its members transferred to Sheffield.

First United Methodist Church continues the Methodist tradition of being the church for others, caring for neighbors far and near.

Information from Q uasquicentennial Booklet, First United Methodist Church, Sheffield, Iowa, 2005


One date but three games to forget in the proud history of Sheffield United

There are many dates that stand out in Sheffield United&aposs history but May 26 will probably be the worst one.

The Blades have lost three out of their four play-off finals on this date - and all three were days to forget.

It was on this day in 1997 that United&aposs miserable run in play-off finals began.

Howard Kendall&aposs Blades had enjoyed a great season and a stunning performance in the second leg at Ipswich had sent United on their way to Wembley.

The Blades had finished fifth that season and after a 1-1 draw at home in the first leg, headed to Portman Road with the game very much in the balance.

Pyotr Kachura&aposs ninth minute goal got United off to a dream start but when Town recovered to lead 2-1, it looked like it was the Tractor Boys who were heading for the final.

However, Andy Walker&aposs goal 13 minutes from time booked United&aposs ticket courtesy of the away goal rule.

The final itself will be remembered for what happened with almost the last kick.

The game was set for extra-time when, with the clock ticking into the 90th minute, David Hopkin curled home the winner from outside the area.

United fans travelled to Cardiff on this day in 2003 slightly more confident.

Neil Warnock&aposs men had enjoyed a brilliant season to get to the Millennium Stadium.

Not only had they reached the FA Cup semi-final and League Cup semi-final this season, a thrilling 4-2 victory at home to Nottingham Forest in the play-off semi-final second leg will go down as one of United&aposs greatest nights in recent history.

Under Warnock, United had made a habit of scoring late goals and pulling off stunning comebacks and cup shocks, so it was understandable that they travelled to the Welsh capital full of confidence.

United had beaten opponents Wolves 3-1 at Molineux and drew 3-3 with them at Bramall Lane. Having put six past them, confidence was high.

However, United fans were left shell-shocked when Wolves raced into a 3-0 lead at half-time and the game was done and dusted.

An unlikely comeback looked like it had potential three minutes after the restart when United were awarded a penalty but Michael Brown&aposs spot-kick was pushed away by Matt Murray.

And to complete a hat-trick of finals to forget on this day, a penalty shoot-out defeat to Huddersfield in the League One final brought the curtain down on a season that promised so much at one stage.

United seemed to be walking towards automatic promotion under Danny Wilson in 2011-12 campaign when, with three games to go and on a run of six straight wins, they needed just one more victory to make an immediate return to the Championship.

However, 35-goal hero Ched Evans was jailed on the eve of their trip to MK Dons and a 1-0 defeat followed by draws against Stevenage and Exeter meant United missed out on second spot on the final day and handed promotion to arch rivals Wednesday.

Still, Wilson had managed to guide his team to Wembley courtesy of Chris Porter&aposs header five minutes from time in the second leg at home to Stevenage.

However, a goalless draw took the final against Huddersfield to penalties and although Town missed their first three spot-kicks, United still lost!

Lee Williamson, Matty Lowton and Andy Taylor all missed their penalties and after all 10 spot-kicks had been taken, it was down to the keepers. Alex Smithies scored his, but Steve Simonsen blazed his over the bar.

As tough as the Palace defeat was to take, this one was just as hard.

United had enjoyed a great season and to see it all fall apart at the end was hard to stomach.


Sheffield Township

A Brief History of Sheffield and Vicinity

In this historical sketch of Sheffield village we shall emphasize the period of time form 1836. We believe, however, that an outline of events previous to 1836 is necessary if we are to record with a true perspective the history of our town. For the actual story of Sheffield may be said to have begun when the first settlers came to the New World.

By virtue of John Cabot’s explorations, in 1498, England laid claim to a vast portion of the Western Hemisphere. In doing so, the English challenged the priority of Spain and the belated (1524) French claims to New World territory. The story of the long diplomatic and military struggle between these three nations will not be detailed here. England emerged from this chronic conflict, in 1763, in possession of the world’s largest colonial empire, only to lose a few years later, as a result of the American Revolution, the thirteen colonies which became the United States. Important events in the French-English conflict – Spain had bee practically eliminated as a world power with the defeat of the Armada in 1588 – took place not far from this region. France proceeded to lay claim to the Ohio River Valley by sending Celeron de Bienville from Canada down the Allegheny and Ohio rivers to formally acquire this territory. At the mouth of each important tributary along the route a lead plate was buried and a notice attached to a nearby tree. Both announced the domain of Louis XV of France. Several of the lead plates have been recovered, and one, as yet unrecovered, is said to have been placed at the junction of the Conewango Creek and the Allegheny River. Christopher Gist, a Pennsylvanian, followed the same route, in 1750, looking for prospective sites or settlements of the Ohio Company of Virginia. In 1753 George Washington was dispatched by Governor Dinwiddie of Virginia to warn the French from Western Pennsylvania. One of the French forts he visited was Le Boeuf, near what is now Waterford, Pennsylvania. The next year Washington, at the head of a small troop, clashed with the French and Indians at Great Meadows, over control of the important junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers. This small skirmish marked the beginning of a great conflict (the Seven Years War) that affected three continents.

Prior to these events, in 1681, Charles II of England granted William Penn the region destined to become our native Commonwealth. The traditional fair-mindedness of Penn prompted him to purchase from the Indians land already his as far as the crown was concerned. Penn’s successors followed this policy, with perhaps less honesty, of purchasing from the Indians. Altogether, from 1686 to 1792, seven treaties were concluded with the Indians and one with the United States government, including all the land within the present bounds of Pennsylvania. Our section of the state was formally acquired from the Indians, known as the Six Nations (Iroquois), by the Treaty of F ort Stanwix in 1784.

At the close of the American Revolution the great region west of the Appalachian Mountains, including the vast Northwest Territory, and north of the Ohio River was opened to settlers. This land, available in most case at a very low price, combined with the possible adventure it offered, served as an incentive to a tide of western emigration which continued, greater at certain times than others, throughout the nineteenth century. The rapidity of the settlement in Western Pennsylvania is indicted by the speedy formation of local government units, the counties and townships. Beginning with the original counties of Philadelphia, Chester, and Bucks, there occurred successive divisions and subdivisions. From the Revolution to 1860 this process took place at a very fast pace. By the latter date most of Pennsylvania’s counties, as we now know them, were laid out. Warren County was formed in 1800 from Allegheny and Lycoming counties. Sheffield Township was set off from Kinzua Township in 1833.

Settlers began to move into the Sheffield region several years before the town was founded, the village of Barnes having been settled in 1828. Most of the early of the early settlers in the township came from New York State, via the Conewango Creek and Warren, and were descendants of New England families. However, the majority of residents in the town of Sheffield in the late sixties were from Sullivan County, New York.

An interesting sidelight to the history of our township is the land speculation carried on by a group of Dutch bankers. They came to be known collectively as the Holland Land Company. About 1794 this corporation acquired a huge acreage of land in Northwestern Pennsylvania, including practically all of Sheffield Township. The object of the speculation was to make an immediate and profitable resale of their land to emigrants. In this object the Dutch bankers were disappointed. They were obliged to hold the lands for many ears before disposal was complete. The story of the sale and resale of the land in Sheffield Township and adjacent districts is too complicated to describe in the space allotted here. It is likely that many of the early settlers secured their titles by “squatter rights,” a process legalized to a degree by Pennsylvania laws. The greater part of the land in this section was, however, acquired by the usual method, in many instances through tax sales.

Persons listed as owning land on the 1834 tax list for Sheffield Township were: James Arnett, Timothy Barnes, John Brown, Joseph Carver, Richard Dunham, John Gilson, John Inglesby, Asahel Kidder, Nathan E. Lacy, Silas Lacy, Jeremiah Lane, David Mead, James T. Osgood, Adam L. Pratt, Orrin T. Stanton, Henry Snapp, Stephen Taylor and John Williamson. The complete list contains thirty-three names, but certain of these early landowners were merely transients or were non-residents who held the land as a speculative investment. At that time (1834) there were no settlements in Sheffield proper, the early homes being established in Barnes, then called Sheffield, in Saybrook, or in other nearby localities.

The pioneers of Sheffield Township found an unbroken wilderness before them. Huge pines along with hemlock and hardwood trees covered the hills and valley. One pine tree is recorded as having produced seventeen logs each sixteen feet in length. Obviously the majority of early settlers were attracted by the lumbering possibilities. Some lumber was manufactured locally by small mills many of which were operated with waterpower. The greater part of the logs were rafted down the Tionesta and Allegheny rivers, to the larger mills, as far as Pittsburgh and Cincinnati.


Sheffield Township

In this historical sketch of Sheffield village we shall emphasize the period of time form 1836. We believe, however, that an outline of events previous to 1836 is necessary if we are to record with a true perspective the history of our town. For the actual story of Sheffield may be said to have begun when the first settlers came to the New World.

By virtue of John Cabot&rsquos explorations, in 1498, England laid claim to a vast portion of the Western Hemisphere. In doing so, the English challenged the priority of Spain and the belated (1524) French claims to New World territory. The story of the long diplomatic and military struggle between these three nations will not be detailed here. England emerged from this chronic conflict, in 1763, in possession of the world&rsquos largest colonial empire, only to lose a few years later, as a result of the American Revolution, the thirteen colonies which became the United States. Important events in the French-English conflict &ndash Spain had bee practically eliminated as a world power with the defeat of the Armada in 1588 &ndash took place not far from this region. France proceeded to lay claim to the Ohio River Valley by sending Celeron de Bienville from Canada down the Allegheny and Ohio rivers to formally acquire this territory. At the mouth of each important tributary along the route a lead plate was buried and a notice attached to a nearby tree. Both announced the domain of Louis XV of France. Several of the lead plates have been recovered, and one, as yet unrecovered, is said to have been placed at the junction of the Conewango Creek and the Allegheny River. Christopher Gist, a Pennsylvanian, followed the same route, in 1750, looking for prospective sites or settlements of the Ohio Company of Virginia. In 1753 George Washington was dispatched by Governor Dinwiddie of Virginia to warn the French from Western Pennsylvania. One of the French forts he visited was Le Boeuf, near what is now Waterford, Pennsylvania. The next year Washington, at the head of a small troop, clashed with the French and Indians at Great Meadows, over control of the important junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers. This small skirmish marked the beginning of a great conflict (the Seven Years War) that affected three continents.

Prior to these events, in 1681, Charles II of England granted William Penn the region destined to become our native Commonwealth. The traditional fair-mindedness of Penn prompted him to purchase from the Indians land already his as far as the crown was concerned. Penn&rsquos successors followed this policy, with perhaps less honesty, of purchasing from the Indians. Altogether, from 1686 to 1792, seven treaties were concluded with the Indians and one with the United States government, including all the land within the present bounds of Pennsylvania. Our section of the state was formally acquired from the Indians, known as the Six Nations (Iroquois), by the Treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1784.

At the close of the American Revolution the great region west of the Appalachian Mountains, including the vast Northwest Territory, and north of the Ohio River was opened to settlers. This land, available in most case at a very low price, combined with the possible adventure it offered, served as an incentive to a tide of western emigration which continued, greater at certain times than others, throughout the nineteenth century. The rapidity of the settlement in Western Pennsylvania is indicted by the speedy formation of local government units, the counties and townships. Beginning with the original counties of Philadelphia, Chester, and Bucks, there occurred successive divisions and subdivisions. From the Revolution to 1860 this process took place at a very fast pace. By the latter date most of Pennsylvania&rsquos counties, as we now know them, were laid out. Warren County was formed in 1800 from Allegheny and Lycoming counties. Sheffield Township was set off from Kinzua Township in 1833.

Settlers began to move into the Sheffield region several years before the town was founded, the village of Barnes having been settled in 1828. Most of the early of the early settlers in the township came from New York State, via the Conewango Creek and Warren, and were descendants of New England families. However, the majority of residents in the town of Sheffield in the late sixties were from Sullivan County, New York.

An interesting sidelight to the history of our township is the land speculation carried on by a group of Dutch bankers. They came to be known collectively as the Holland Land Company. About 1794 this corporation acquired a huge acreage of land in Northwestern Pennsylvania, including practically all of Sheffield Township. The object of the speculation was to make an immediate and profitable resale of their land to emigrants. In this object the Dutch bankers were disappointed. They were obliged to hold the lands for many ears before disposal was complete. The story of the sale and resale of the land in Sheffield Township and adjacent districts is too complicated to describe in the space allotted here. It is likely that many of the early settlers secured their titles by &ldquosquatter rights,&rdquo a process legalized to a degree by Pennsylvania laws. The greater part of the land in this section was, however, acquired by the usual method, in many instances through tax sales.

Persons listed as owning land on the 1834 tax list for Sheffield Township were: James Arnett, Timothy Barnes, John Brown, Joseph Carver, Richard Dunham, John Gilson, John Inglesby, Asahel Kidder, Nathan E. Lacy, Silas Lacy, Jeremiah Lane, David Mead, James T. Osgood, Adam L. Pratt, Orrin T. Stanton, Henry Snapp, Stephen Taylor and John Williamson. The complete list contains thirty-three names, but certain of these early landowners were merely transients or were non-residents who held the land as a speculative investment. At that time (1834) there were no settlements in Sheffield proper, the early homes being established in Barnes, then called Sheffield, in Saybrook, or in other nearby localities.

The pioneers of Sheffield Township found an unbroken wilderness before them. Huge pines along with hemlock and hardwood trees covered the hills and valley. One pine tree is recorded as having produced seventeen logs each sixteen feet in length. Obviously the majority of early settlers were attracted by the lumbering possibilities. Some lumber was manufactured locally by small mills many of which were operated with waterpower. The greater part of the logs were rafted down the Tionesta and Allegheny rivers, to the larger mills, as far as Pittsburgh and Cincinnati.

From the book Historical Collections of Sheffield Township authored by Bruce A Smith
1943


History and heritage

Explore the history of the University and our role as a civic university.

History of the University

The University of Sheffield developed from three local institutions: the Sheffield School of Medicine, Firth College and the Sheffield Technical School. The School of Medicine, founded 1828, was by far the oldest. Its early history was very insecure and it was saved from collapse by the opening of Firth College, which took over the teaching of all basic science subjects to medical students.

Firth College was one of a group of university colleges founded in the later 19th century. It developed out of the Cambridge University Extension Movement, a scheme designed to bring university teaching to the large towns and cities of England, most of which lacked any university provision. The success of these courses in Sheffield led Mark Firth, a local steel manufacturer, to establish the College in 1879 as a centre for teaching Arts and Science subjects.

A civic university

When the University asked the people of Sheffield for donations in 1904, Sheffield responded. Over £50,000 was raised by penny donations from local steel and factory workers and residents – equivalent to over £15 million in today’s money. Thanks to Sheffielders' generosity, the University was able to establish a world-class institution.

In turn, we pledged to help the local economy, a goal we have achieved by partnering with Sheffield businesses and sharing skills and information. We also promised to help bring the UK in line with other nations – an ongoing result of our pioneering research and a target met by producing highly skilled graduates from across the globe.

Today, our University represents a global community whose citizenship stretches into more than 150 countries. We collaborate with individuals, businesses and organisations to make a difference locally and globally.

The Sheffield Technical School

The Sheffield Technical School was the product of local concern about the need for better technical training of the men responsible for running the great industries of Sheffield, particularly steelmaking. A movement was started within Firth College to collect funds to create a technical department, which was established in 1884 as the Sheffield Technical School. In 1886 the School moved to new premises on the site of the old Grammar School at St George's Square.

In 1897, the three institutions were amalgamated by Royal Charter to form the University College of Sheffield. This step was part of the plan to link up with the Victoria University, a federation of the University Colleges at Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds.

By 1900, however, the Federal University was disintegrating and within a few years independent universities were formed from the three University Colleges.

On 31 May 1905 the University of Sheffield was granted its Royal Charter, and in July the new Firth Court Building on Western Bank was opened by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. St George's Square remained the centre of Applied Science departments, with Arts, Medicine and Science being housed at Western Bank.

The University in 1905

At the time of the University's foundation in 1905 there were 114 full-time students reading for degrees in Arts, Pure Science, Medicine and Applied Science. In 1919 when returning ex-servicemen were admitted in large numbers, the full-time student figure rose to a short-lived peak of about 1,000. By then the Faculty of Applied Science had split into Engineering and Metallurgy the University's first Hall of Residence (the original Stephenson Hall) had been established and the Edgar Allen library had opened (1909).

At that time the University was as committed to non-degree teaching as to teaching full-time students. Courses covered not only many conventional academic subjects but also topics as diverse as cow-keeping, railway economics, mining and razor-grinding. During the First World War some of these were replaced by teaching of (and participation in) munitions making, medical appliances design and production, translation and politics.

Between the two wars full-time student numbers stabilised at about 750 and expansion into new areas of specialist teaching and research continued slowly. The Second World War brought with it new areas of specialist research and training - in, for example, radar, dietary and vitamin studies, production of anaesthetics and chemicals (as substitutes for materials previously imported from Europe), magnetism, fuel production and economy, naval cartography, glass manufacture and English language teaching.

Since the Second World War

Since the Second World War, many older houses have been brought into academic use and major new buildings have been constructed - the Main Library in 1959, and the Arts Tower, Hicks Building, Alfred Denny Building, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Chemical Engineering Building, University House, five Halls of Residence and the Union of Students in the 1960s.

New buildings for Geography and Psychology followed in the 1970s, along with the Crookesmoor Building (for Law and Management), the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, and purpose-built student flats. The next decade saw the opening of the Octagon Centre, the Sir Henry Stephenson Building (for engineering), and major extensions at the Northern General Hospital.

In the 1990s, new premises for the School of Clinical Dentistry, the Management School, the Division of Education, St George's Library (incorporating Blackwell's University Bookshop) and St George's Flats and Lecture Theatre were opened, together with extensions to Stephenson, Halifax, and Tapton Halls of Residence, and three new blocks of student flats.

The Regent Court building, which houses the Departments of Computer Science and Information Studies and the Sheffield Centre for Health and Related Research, were also completed. The Union of Students underwent a £5 million development programme, improving welfare, social and meetings facilities.

Following the University's integration with the Sheffield and North Trent College of Nursing and Midwifery in 1995, a building programme provided new facilities for nursing and midwifery teaching and research. This includes the extension and conversion of the St George's Hospital site on Winter Street, and the construction of a new building at the Northern General Hospital.

Our coat of arms

The University Arms, whose background colour is azure, contains a gold-edged open book at its centre, on which is inscribed Disce Doce (Learn and Teach). On either side is a sheaf of eight silver arrows, which is derived from the shield of old Sheffield. The gold crown is the Crown of Success and the White Rose of York denotes the University's home county. The scroll carries the motto of Firth College, Rerum Cognoscere Causas (To Discover the Causes of Things from Virgil's Georgics II, 490).

The coat of arms should not be confused with the University's logo, which appears at the top left of this page. The logo consists of a redrawn version of the coat of arms set alongside the University's name in our own distinctive Stephenson font, on a white background. Introduced in 2005, the University's centenary year, the logo complements but does not supersede the coat of arms, which remains the University's official heraldic symbol.

Reproduction of the University's Coat of Arms is restricted by copyright to formal University of Sheffield documents. It may not be used by external organisations in their marketing activities, whether in hard copy or on the web.


Bridging the Watford Gap

A couple of years back I was taken to see Saracens (they play something called rugby) at Vicarage Road. As I headed towards the free bar in the Executive Lounge I stopped to have a look at the photos on Watford’s ‘Wall of Fame’. Cliff Holton, Luther Blissett, John Barnes, Stewart Scullion, Keith Eddy, Tony Currie…it was then that it struck me how many players we’ve nicked off Watford over the years. The signing of Danny Webber towards the end of last season kept up a long and mostly noble tradition.

According to my dad it all goes back to February 20th 1960. Watford were on their way to promotion from the Fourth Division when they came to Bramall Lane for an FA Cup Fifth Round tie. United won 3-2 with Doc Pace getting a hat trick and Cliff Holton getting both of Watford’s goals. The Watford player who caught the eye of John Harris was Barry ‘the Kid’ Hartle, a slightly built left sided midfielder who was adept at taking free kicks. My dad remembers him as “a quick, skilful player who was impressive in flashes”. Indeed, Hartle stuck around Bramall Lane until July 1966 making 117 appearances and scoring 21 goals before joining Carlisle. But solid though Hartle was, he wasn’t a patch on the next Watford bargain.

In January 1968, United beat Watford 1-0 in the FA Cup. This opened the way for us to sign the Hornet’s highly rated England Youth International, Tony Currie. Currie had arrived at Vicarage Road after being released by Queens Park Rangers and Chelsea who had both tried him at left half. He worked for a building firm for a short time before Watford Youth Team manager Frank Grimes offered him a one year contract and it proved to be the making of him.

Currie was a shy kid off the park, but on it he was all flamboyance. Unitedites remember him sitting on the ball against Arsenal and dribbling down the touchline waving to the crowd against Derby, and one fan who watched him in the Watford Juniors team recalled how Currie would “skip rather than sprint”. Grimes decided that this talent would be better used further up the park and moved him into the forward line. It paid off and in September 1967, Watford manager Ken Furphy introduced him to the first team. His performances for the Third Division side attracted plenty of attention and England recognition and towards the end of 1967 John Harris struck a deal whereby United would get the 18 year old for 㿆,500, but only when Watford were knocked out of the Cup. When Colin Hill scored United's winner, TC became a Blade. In his 18 match career with the Hertfordshire club, Currie had scored 9 goals.

By May 1971 Currie’s awesome performances had inspired the Blades to the brink of promotion when the two clubs paths crossed again in the final game of the season with the Blades needing only a draw to go up. Watford were safe from relegation but came out fighting at Bramall Lane and left winger Stewart Scullion hit the crossbar inside the first ten minutes. After twenty minutes United’s Gil Reece jinked his way into the box but was brought down by Keith Eddy, and Alan Woodward put United in front from the penalty. Scullion was as impressive as ever but he couldn’t prevent an inspired United side winning 3-0 and going up. Nevertheless, he had done enough to convince John Harris that he was worth taking to Bramall Lane for 㿇,500.

Scullion had been at Watford since 1965 playing on the left wing and he was a senior part of the side which finally made it into the Second Division for the first time in their history in 1969. Along the way they earned a famous win over First Division Manchester United in the Fourth Round of the Cup with Scullion getting the winner. The following season Furphy was working on a shoestring (something which impressed the board at Bramall Lane) and one Watford fan remembers that “All that season Scully was a ray of sunshine in often grim team performances”. It was his goal against Norwich in the final game of the season which secured the point that kept them up. Indeed, when United had bought Currie they had initially wanted Scullion, but he turned down a move north.

He was a regular fixture in the United team which took the First Division by storm in late 1971, going unbeaten in the first 12 games and topping the table until George Best scored the goal that the BBC never tire of showing and United drifted to a mid table finish. Scullion divided opinion at the Lane, some with high regard for his skill, others regarding him as ‘greedy’. The sad fact is that he never settled in Sheffield and after his first season he appeared only sporadically until he was replaced on the left by Jim Bone and he went back to Watford in December 1973, but he was not able to prevent them slipping into the Fourth Division two years later.

In 1971 Ken Furphy had left Watford for Blackburn, frustrated at the shortage of cash. This opened the door for United to swoop on another Vicarage Road old boy, Keith Eddy, in August 1972. Eddy was a talented midfielder who was a regular in Barrow’s first team at 18 where he caught the eye of nearby Workington boss Furphy. When Furphy took over at Watford, he made Eddy one of his first signings and he quickly became captain of their 1969 promotion side.

Playing alongside crowd favourite Tony Currie Eddy took a little while to settle at Bramall Lane but his clever play and work rate were soon appreciated. He was particularly good at playing the ball out of defence, either with a probing run or accurate long pass. As one Blade who saw him (my dad) recalls, “When United played well, Currie played well. When Keith Eddy played well, Sheffield United played well”. Indeed, when Furphy got the Bramall Lane job in December 1973 he made Eddy the captain after an unsuccessful experiment with Currie as skipper. With fellow Watford graduate Currie, Eddy was the heartbeat of the team which included Jim Brown, Len Badger, Ted Hemsley, Eddie Colquhoun, Alan Woodward and Bill Dearden and finished 6th in the First Division in 1974-1975.

John Harris’ last signing as United manager before handing over to Furphy had been another from Watford, utility man Colin Franks. Franks had been destined for great things at Watford, but had never really settled into a position. His highlight came in the FA Cup quarter final against Stoke in 1970, when he blasted a 25 yard screamer past Gordon Banks. He came to United in 1973 but surprisingly failed to establish himself as a first team starter under Ken Furphy. His chance came in late 1975 when, with United already looking good for the drop, Furphy was sacked and replaced with Jimmy Sirrell. The following season Franks was ever present but with an aging team and crippling debts the rot had set in at United. When Franks had joined Currie, Scullion and Eddy at Bramall Lane in 1973, United had been one of the country's top sides. When he became the last of these Watford old boys to leave, for Toronto Blizzard in 1979, we had slumped to the Third Division for the first time in our history.

During United’s disastrous slide through the Leagues between 1976 and 1981 and subsequent, stumbling recovery under Ian Porterfield, the Watford connection lay dormant. Indeed, it wasn’t until the next man made the journey from Vicarage Road to Bramall Lane that United got back to the big time. That man was Dave ‘Harry’ Bassett, who succeeded Graham Taylor in 1987.

Bassett had actually been offered professional terms at Watford by Ken Furphy as a youngster but had turned down the chance and had made his managerial reputation taking Wimbledon from the Fourth to the First Division. On arriving at Vicarage Road Bassett did exactly what he did when he arrived at Bramall Lane the following year he dumped most of the existing side (“creaking” and “well past its sell by date” according to Bassett) and brought in several players who would later follow him to the Lane.

The first was defender Mark ‘Guppy’ Morris who had previously played under Bassett at Wimbledon. In his first appearances Morris was played as a holding midfielder and looked lost, so much so that Watford fans began chanting “Off, off, off”. Eventually though he slotted in at centre back alongside John McLelland and was impressive enough to finish second, behind McLelland, in the player of the year awards. Unfortunately for Morris he was injured in the opening game of the following season and when he recovered he found that his place in the team had been taken by a youngster called David Holdsworth and he moved to the Blades in July 1989. Bassett made three other signings while at Watford whom he later brought to Sheffield, one great and two not so great.

One of the not so greats was right winger Peter Hetherston who joined Watford from Falkirk. In a side which was battling relegation from the off Hetherston was impressive in his first game against Darlington in the League Cup when Watford won 8-0, scoring two of the goals, but he was subbed against Southampton the week later and barely played again.

Despite this he was one of Bassett’s first signings for the Blades when he joined in February 1988. Sadly he rarely looked interested and played only 11 games for United as they slithered towards relegation to the old Third Division. It didn’t help that Hetherston managed to hit the woodwork with an alarming regularity. In the end it came down to a two legged tie against Bristol City, the third placed team in Division Three. Away at Ashton Gate United slumped to a 1-0 defeat and Tony Currie described Hetherston’s performance as a “disgrace to the profession”. Bassett clearly agreed and shipped him back to Falkirk. The other not so great was defender Cliff Powell who made one appearance for Watford as a sub in the Full Members Cup before heading for Sheffield where he was soon injured and appeared just 17 times in three years before retiring in 1991.

But the great was the ready made replacement for Watford favourite John Barnes, whom Taylor had sold to Liverpool, Tony Agana. By this time Bassett was unpopular with the Watford fans, Barnes had been a hero and coming from non League Weymouth Agana quickly found himself at the receiving end of a lot of stick. In January 1988 they faced Manchester United and Agana was the star of the show, playing like the electrifying wizard Blades fans remember. Only an excellent performance by Chris Turner in the Manchester United goal kept Watford goalless as Agana tore the back four to shreds single handed. But luck was not on Bassett’s side and Brian McLair remembered “we were absolutely murdered – and won 1-0”. Bassett left after one more game and Agana had only 45 minutes under his replacement Steve Harrison before the Hornets were relegated.

This was very much Watford’s loss as a month later Bassett, now in charge at Bramall Lane, made Agana and Hetherston his first signings and Agana scored against Barnsley on his debut. If Hetherston contributed little, Agana became a Blades legend when he forged a devastating strike partnership the following season with Brian Deane, the pair getting 30 goals each as the Blades bounced straight back to the Second Division, including an unforgettable game against Chester where both scored hat tricks. The following season saw the Blades tear through Division Two, with Agana getting 10 goals, and winning promotion to the First Division for the first time since the days of Tony Currie. Sadly, once up, Agana struggled with injury and seemed to have lost favour with Dave Bassett and found appearances hard to come by. He was sold Neil Warnock’s Notts County in November 1991 but no one who was there will forget his two goals against Norwich on the last day of our first season back when we played for the last time in glorious sunshine in front of the old, roofless Kop.

By October 1996 the situation at Bramall Lane had changed beyond all recognition. United had been relegated in 1994 and controversial chairman Reg Brealey had sold out to Mike ‘Megabucks’ McDonald. He brought in a big name manager, Howard Kendall, and some big name players, Don Hutchison and John Ebbrell, for more than a million each. The penny pinching days were over but when the Watford connection was revived again that month to sign the man who had forced Mark Morris out of the Watford side, David Holdsworth was considered a bit of a bargain at 𧺬,000.

Holdsworth came through the youth set up at Watford and was a regular by the time he was out of his teens by which time he had captained England Under 17’s and been an England Youth and Under 21 international. All this proved that he was a player of immense promise, “he's fast, he's strong, he's great in the air, he's aware of what's going on” is how one Watford fan remembered him, but, as another recalled, “I seem to remember him playing well alongside an experienced CB (Glenn Roeder, Colin Foster) but struggling when he was the senior guy”. He never grew into the leader the Hornets were hoping for and Watford were relegated to the new Second Division in 1996.

He arrived at the Lane after a couple of what Kendall called “amateurish” results (against Stockport in the League Cup and Southend in the League) and was a steadying performer alongside Doug Hodgson and Michael Vonk as United pushed for promotion. Importantly, he finally developed the responsibility which he’d not shown at Vicarage Road and soon became captain leading United to the heartbreaking Play Off defeat to Palace at Wembley in May 1997.

Holdsworth’s newly acquired leadership skills were sorely tested in his time at the Lane. Kendall was off almost as soon as David Hopkin’s shot hit the back of the net and Mike McDonald appeared to lose confidence and interest now that a quick return on his investment was out of the question. Nigel Spackman got the managers job for the next season but left in March when Mike McDonald (who resigned as club chairman shortly after) sold the two top strikers, Brian Deane and Jan Age Fjortoft, on the same day and scuppered United’s chances of automatic promotion and leading to another play off failure. Another manager, Steve Bruce, was in charge in 1998 and replaced Carl Tiler as Holdsworth’s partner. Holdsworth was injured for four months and amid further boardroom turmoil Bruce left at the end of the season. By that time though, Holdsworth had gone to Birmingham for ٟ.2 million.

As United’s fortunes had lurched from the Premiership chasing of Howard Kendall to the relegation battling of Adrian Heath Watford had bounced back under their captain, centre back Robbie Page. Born in Cardiff Page had nevertheless come through the youth team at Watford, securing his starting place in the first season in Division Two and Page was made captain by the returning Graham Taylor a year later as well as winning his first Wales cap. Watford won the Second Division Championship in 1998 (with Page playing alongside Tommy Mooney) and the following year they beat Bolton in the Play Off Final at Wembley to return to the top flight. Once up a Watford fan remembered that “The Premiership season didn't have many highpoints', but Robert Page was one of them”. After relegation Watford got Gianluca Vialli in as manager and the same Watford fan recalls that “it all seemed to go wrong. He began to make too many mistakes. His passing, never good at the best of times, was horribly exposed in its limitations. He seemed to slow down, and was beaten in the air too often. His leadership ability seemed to disappear visibly, and it was a shame.” It was to be spookily similar during his time with the Blades.

Neil Warnock signed him for 𧸖,000 in August 2001 and he came into a side which was an odd mixture of the old (Keith Curle and Simon Tracey), the new (Phil Jagielka and Michael Tonge) and the exotic (Patrick Suffo and George Santos). It wasn’t a mix that worked particularly well and United drifted to a mid table finish. What was memorable were the events of the West Brom game in March 2002 which saw an offloading of players prior to the new season. The following season was a great time to be a United fan as we pushed for promotion and got to the semi finals of both cups. Michael Brown was simply awesome, Paddy Kenny earned legend status, Michael Tonge was dazzling, Stuart McCall ran the show and Phil Jagielka justified his tag as one of the best young defenders in Britain. There were plenty of other stars that season but Page was one of the most consistently impressive, looking calm and authoritative and, against Arsenal in the Cup particularly, a player of some skill.

Sadly the following season Page was made captain, partnered with new signing Chris Morgan and his show veered off the road. Indeed, the words of the Watford fan who described his final months at Vicarage Road applied almost exactly to the way he left Sheffield United. After a reported bust up with Warnock, Page was off to Cardiff for the start of last season.

Which brings us to Danny Webber. The ins and outs of his transfer deserve a whole article of their own suffice to say he is now a Blades player. When he came on against Reading for his debut he looked as lively as anybody on the pitch and looked the one United player capable of creating something that afternoon. But it was only two minutes into his full debut, against Leeds at Elland Road that he slalomed his way in from the left and finished a fantastic goal. The early indications are good but this is Sheffield United we're talking about. The question is will he turn out to be a Tony Currie or a Peter Hetherston?


History

Sheffield Village is rich in human history that began several thousand years ago with Native American Indian occupation along the beach ridge of an ancient glacial lake (North Ridge) and at the confluence of streams tributary to the Black River.

Archaeological evidence indicates that several Native American cultures established settlements in Sheffield over the ages, but by the mid-1600s few were left in northeastern Ohio.

Soon after the War of 1812, hearty pioneers from New England began to recognize the natural attributes of northern Ohio. In January 1815, Captain Jabez Burrell and Captain John Day of Sheffield, Massachusetts purchased a large tract of land designated as Township 7 of Range 17 in the Connecticut Western Reserve. They formed a partnership with several other Massachusetts families and later that year and the following spring settlers began to arrive in the valley of the Black River at the mouth of French Creek where they founded a community called Sheffield in honor of their former home.

Living up to a provision in the purchase agreement, in 1817 Captains Burrell and Day erected the township&rsquos first saw and grist mills along Black River about one-half-mile upstream from the mouth of French Creek. The settlers also built a schoolhouse and a Congregational Church. When Lorain County was formed in 1824, the population of Sheffield included 44 adult males and their families. The first action of the new County Commissioners was to officially establish the Sheffield as a Township and formally adopt the name Sheffield.

In 1836, Oberlin College established the Sheffield Manual Labor Institute on the Burrell Homestead in Sheffield, where for the first time in the nation. Women and African-American students were permitted to attend college classes alongside white male students. Then, another major wave of settlers came to Sheffield in the 1840s and 1850s when immigrants from Bavaria, Germany arrived and eventually built St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church. Prior to the Civil War several Sheffield residents, such as Robbins Burrell and Milton Garfield, were active abolitionists and operated stations on the Underground Railroad. Captain Aaron Root, a Great Lakes shipmaster from Sheffield, secretly carried runaway slaves aboard his vessels to freedom in Canada. During the Civil War many of Sheffield&rsquos sons served in Union Army and Navy&mdash23 of them are buried in the Village&rsquos Garfield Cemetery on North Ridge.

Sheffield continued as primarily a farming community in the late 1800s, producing 85,000 bushels of corn, oats, wheat, and barley and 30,500 pounds of butter, cheese, and maple sugar in 1878. A dramatic change took place in 1894 when the City of Lorain annexed a large portion of the northwestern part of Sheffield Township and the Johnson Steel Company (later the National Tube Company of US Steel Corporation) built a large mill and housing development there, known as South Lorain, on the west side of the Black River. By 1906 several steam and electric railroads had been built through Sheffield to service the steel mill and provide commuter passenger service.

In 1920 Township residents living east of the Black River voted to withdraw from Sheffield Township and form the incorporated Village of Sheffield Lake. In 1923, the new Village constructed Brookside School (which was partially damaged by the Tornado that devastated Lorain in June 1924) to replace several Township schools that were built in the 1870s and 1880s. Brookside graduated its first senior class in 1930. By the early 1930s the new Village was experiencing internal problems&mdashbecause the south end of the Village had a sparse population with large farms, while the north end had a greater population living on small lots, the residents of these two segments found their interests to be incompatible. In 1933, the farmers in the south end voted almost unanimously to separate from Sheffield Lake Village.

The north end remained as the Village of Sheffield Lake, while the south formed a new entity known as Brookside Township, which in 1934 was incorporated to form the Village of Sheffield. Clyde B. McAllister, a farmer from North Ridge, was elected as the new Village&rsquos first mayor.

Because the new Village of Sheffield had no public buildings when it was formed in January 1934, Mayor McAllister convened the first meeting of the Village Council in his home. In December 1934 the Village purchased the North Ridge District No. 2 Schoolhouse from the Sheffield Township School District for $500. This elegant Queen Anne-style red brick schoolhouse, built in 1883 adjacent to Garfield Cemetery, was no longer needed by the School Board with the opening of Brookside School several years earlier. In 1935 the building was converted to the Sheffield Village Hall and served that purpose for the next 65 years.

In 1978 the Village Hall and Garfield Cemetery were placed on the National Register of Historic Places along with two other nineteenth century structures on North Ridge&mdashMilton Garfield House (built in 1839) and the Halsey Garfield House (built in 1854). The Jabez Burrell House (built in 1820) on East River Road at French Creek is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Sheffield Village Hall currently serves as the Village Clerk/Treasurer office and the office for Garfield Cemetery.

In the 1940s and 1950s Sheffield&rsquos North Ridge became known as The Greenhouse Tomato Capital of America, as 24 acres of land were covered with glass. In 1957 a new fire station was built adjacent to James Day Park on a bluff overlooking French Creek. In 1999 this building was enlarged and now serves as Sheffield Village&rsquos Municipal Complex. In the 1960s the Lorain County Metro Parks began preserving natural areas along the Black River and French Creek, which now includes a Nature Center and many miles of paved and earthen trails within Sheffield Village&mdashthe latest being the Steel Mill Trail, opened in May 2008, with high bridges over the Black River and French Creek. Today Sheffield is in a period of transition, as farmlands are being diminished and the Village became a modern residential and commercial center. The Sheffield Village Historical Society was formed in 2005 to preserve the heritage of those who toiled to found the Village and who found joy in their accomplishments.

Please visit the Sheffield Village Historical Society page for more history of our Community.


Watch the video: Sheffield United 1967-1968 (August 2022).